ICTS Reports

RuleofLaw1Ensuring the safety and interests of citizens at home and abroad continues to be every government’s paramount responsibility. The purpose of this report is to focus on the interface between terrorism and the rule of law. The key question is whether nations can strike a balance between security concerns and protecting civil liberties and constitutional order.

“Terrorism and the Rule of Law: Selected Perspectives” features presentations by experts with extensive academic and government experience. Some of the topics covered include the “War on Terror,” the role of intelligence, law enforcement, detention, civil and military trials, punishment of terrorists, hostage-taking, and other relevant issues.

Download the report here.

WMD8 17a

Preventing the proliferation of biological, chemical, radiological, and nuclear weapons has been a major priority for many nation states in the post-World War II era. Additionally, in the aftermath of 9/11, there has been a growing awareness globally of the potential dangers posed by terrorist groups who may resort to WMD capabilities.

The purpose of this report on “Preventing WMD Terrorism: Ten Perspectives” is to provide some recent insights from experts on lessons learned, assessments of future challenges, and offer recommendations on response strategies to reduce the risk on national and international levels.

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Biological Terrorism cover june

Biological security concerns are permanent fixtures of history, ranging from Mother Nature’s infectious diseases to man-made threats by state and non-state actors. Thus, as the international community is currently approaching the 100 year anniversary of the 1918 influenza pandemic that killed an estimated 50-100 million people, it is assessing the implications of the recent epidemics of Ebola and Zika, considering potential dangers of biological terrorism, and beginning to offer recommendations on response strategies to reduce the risk on national, regional, and global levels.

This June 2017 report on “Biological Terrorism: Past Lessons and Future Outlook” serves as an academic effort to provide insights from former U.S. officials, members of Congress, and other experts on these looming security challenges.

Download the report here.

LatinAmerica1aLatin America continues to face multiple security challenges including natural disasters, infectious diseases, organized crime, terrorism, migration, economic development, and threats to democratic governance.

This April 2017 report on “Latin America’s Strategic Outlook: Populist Politics, Health Concerns, and Other Security Challenges” deals with recent security-related developments such as the Rio Olympics, the Zika epidemic, and post-Castro-era assessments.

Download the report here.

Tehran's Bomb ChallengeIntroduction
Professor Yonah Alexander
Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies

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     The rise of power in Iran of the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and the November 1979 seizure of the United States Embassy in Tehran and of some 60 American hostages by “revolutionary students” triggered a flurry of introspection in Washington concerning the policies which successive Administrations had followed with a country of enormous strategic and economic importance in the Middle East.

     Among the questions that have been raised during that historical period were the following: What had gone wrong? Why had the United States failed to assess correctly the strength of the elements that brought down the Shah [Shahanshah, King of Kings, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi in January 1979, after a 37-year rule]? Why had the United States linked its fortunes so closely to those of the Shah in the first place? What did the national interests of the United States consist of as applied to Iran? What were the full implications of the transformation of Iran from a friendly ally to a hostile adversary of the United States?

 

     These and related issues were analyzed in a study on The United States and Iran: A Documentary History, co-edited by Yonah Alexander and Allan Nanes and published by the University Publications of America in 1980. This work was prepared in association with the World Power Studies Program of the Center for Strategic and International Studies at Georgetown University.

     During the next 34 years, other research efforts have been undertaken, focusing on Iran’s strategic and tactical intentions, capabilities, and actions. For instance, Tehran’s expanding terrorism role was discussed within the framework of the study, Terrorism: As State-Sponsored of Covert Warfare, co-authored by Ray S. Cline and Yonah Alexander and published by Hero Books in 1986. This work was undertaken in cooperation with the Center of Strategic and International Studies of Georgetown University and prepared at the request of the Subcommittee on Security and Terrorism for the use of the Committee on the Judiciary of the United States Senate. This publication underscored the fact that the goal of psychological terror and physical violence employed by totalitarian dictatorships, like the Iranian regime, is to maintain control of their own people and to expand this kind of control over other regions and nations. In the face of Iran’s terrorism challenge, the United States, its friends and allies, particularly Israel, have developed a wide range of countermeasures. They consisted inter alia of intelligence, economic and security assistance, political and diplomatic pressures, economic sanctions, clandestine counter-terrorism infiltrations, and overt military operations.

 

 Despite these activities, Tehran continued to resort to terrorism at home and abroad. Additionally, Iran’s apparent vision of a country becoming the dominant power in the Middle East had led its leadership to develop a nuclear program in open defiance of United Nations resolutions. In this connection, the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies (IUCTS, a consortium of universities and think tanks operating in over 40 countries) had conducted a major research project resulting in the release of a study on The New Iranian Leadership: Ahmadinejad, Nuclear Ambition, and the Middle East. This book, co-authored by Yonah Alexander and Milton Hoenig, was published by Praeger Security International in 2007. It documents Ahmadinejad’s background and rise to power and explains the structure of the Iranian Revolutionary government—the competing centers of power and the major players. The study then details the terrorist groups funded and armed by Iran, primarily Hizballah and Hamas. It also provides a comprehensive picture of Iran’s apparent aspirations to acquire nuclear weapons, as well as the related implications for regional and global security concerns.

     Moreover, numerous seminars and conferences related to the multiple Iranian security challenges to the international community were held in the United States and abroad. For example, on December 6, 2011, a seminar was co-sponsored by the IUCTS, International Center for Terrorism Studies (ICTS) at Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, and the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies (IUCLS) at the International Law Institute. The topic was “Iran’s Nuclear Program: A Final Warning?” and held at Potomac Institute for Policy Studies in Arlington, VA. The event highlighted Tehran’s nuclear weapon program amidst the backdrop of an uncertain political reality in the Middle East. Moderated by Professor Yonah Alexander, a panel of experts included Dr. Leonard S. Spector (Executive Director, Washington, DC, Office, James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterrey Institute of International Studies); Dr. Christopher A. Ford (Senior Fellow and Director, Center for Technology and Global Security, Hudson Institute); Michael Eisenstadt (Director, Military and Security Studies Program, Washington Institute for Near East Policy); Guy Roberts (Former Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Policy and Director, Nuclear Policy, Emerging Security Challenges Division, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO); and Professor Don Wallace, Jr. (Chairman, International Law Institute). Because of the relevance of this topic, a summary of this event follows.

     Dr. Spector offered four main points: First, he warned that the West had only one to three years to counter Iran before it gained the ability to rapidly produce a small arsenal of nuclear warheads. Second, he stressed that although current measures to stop Iran from achieving this goal are often innovative and are being pressed aggressively by the United States and like- minded governments, they have not yet proven effective, and Iran continues to make progress toward acquiring a nuclear-weapon capability.

     Third, he said, this apparent reality makes it necessary to escalate U.S. and international efforts both to pressure Iran to halt its sensitive nuclear activities and to prevent its further progress. Such escalation is likely to entail tougher sanctions against the Central Bank of Iran and, in all probability, an intensification of covert operations against Iran’s nuclear program. Citing comments by the then Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, Dr. Spector noted that overt military action, while “on the table” in theory, appears to be “off the table,” as a practical matter, at least for now. But Panetta left the door open for covert actions. Some, such as “accidental” explosions at sensitive sites, Dr. Spector argued, might be as destructive as an air strike. He also noted that sanctions originally directed at the Iranian nuclear program had become so broad that they appear to be aimed increasingly at weakening the Iranian regime.
   

     That brought Dr. Spector to his fourth point, which he referred to as “Operation Arab Spring.” Noting that the regime of Bashar Assad appears to be crumbling in Syria, he stressed that when it falls, possibly within the next six months, Iran will lose its only national ally in the region. This would not only reduce the risk of Iran fomenting a wider war in the Middle East in response to interventions to curb its nuclear program, but would also force the Iranian Revolutionary Government to focus its energies on what will certainly be growing domestic challenges to its survival – challenges that will take strength from the Syrian precedent. Indeed, Dr. Spector concluded, if one looks at the combination of what is happening in Syria and the broader sanctions being imposed to undermine the legitimacy of the current Iranian regime, overall U.S. “grand strategy” may well be to promote the overthrow of the mullahs once the Syrian domino has fallen.

     The next speaker, Dr. Christopher A. Ford, discussed three distinct arguments against clandestine warfare and how he expected that U.S. officials might respond to those arguments in pondering the prospect of such a campaign. The first argument he addressed discussed the notion that clandestine warfare is illegal. Dr. Ford set the grounds for his argument acknowledging that both the United States and Israel have left overt military action on the table for addressing Iran’s nuclear program, which implies that a military offensive would be deemed legal by both actors. (Indeed, both nations have set a precedent of preemptive military strikes on rogue states’ nuclear weapon facilities as demonstrated in Iraq and Syria.) Dr. Ford argued that if preemptive action against an offensive weapons of mass destruction (WMD) program is an act of self defense and is a “legally available” option, then so also must be the “lesser-included” policy of covert war.

     He also discussed the implications of a covert war, as compared to an overt military strike, through the prism of international humanitarian law. Traditional military strikes might be more effective than most covert means in damaging a nuclear program, but they might also produce more collateral damage and come at a higher geopolitical cost than covert strikes. Covert methods might thus be depicted as morally superior to “legal” military action, and certainly not inconsistent with law-of-war principles stressing the minimization of suffering.

     Dr. Ford then discussed the “Caroline Case” of 1837, which provides a frequently-cited articulation of the legal precedent for preemptive warfare. The British viewpoint expressed in that episode – coupled with the parties’ difficulty in arriving at a common understanding of how to operationalize the agreed legal standard, which suggests the flexibility of the concept – arguably supports the idea that it is justifiable to engage in anticipatory self-defense against an assailant in the more modern context of emerging WMD threats. Dr. Ford then suggested that U.S. officials might find a further ground for a campaign against Iran because Tehran is passively and directly supporting terrorism, going so far as aiding and abetting al-Qa’ida and the Taliban in their war against the United States. The United States has demonstrated that it believes itself to have legal authority for using force against al-Qa’ida and all its supporters, grounded in self-defense and the Authorization for Use of Military Force enacted on September 18, 2001, and this might be felt now to apply against Iran.

     The next argument against covert action Dr. Ford addressed is the idea that covert warfare would provoke a bloodbath and that Iran is on a much more level playing field in this type of warfare. He agreed that Iran is adept at covert war, but noted that Iran already considers itself to be in such a conflict, and has been actively engaged in a covert war against the United States for the past three decades. Iran has supported and directed terror operations against the United States ranging from the Beirut bombing to the plot to assassinate the Saudi ambassador to the United States. From Iran’s perspective, no covert war taboo remains to be broken; the main question is what the United States will do on its side of the campaign.

     The last idea that Dr. Ford discusses is that counter-proliferation is unlikely to stop Iran’s program. He acknowledges that this notion does indeed have some legitimacy, suggesting that disruptive tactics will not end the program but merely delay it. Though these tactics by themselves may prove to be unsuccessful, however, if coupled with other strategies to address the Iranian problem, they might provide enough time to stop the program by other means (e.g., regime change). Finally, Dr. Ford stresses the importance of making Iran policy with an eye not merely to counter-proliferation in Iran but also to the international nuclear nonproliferation regime as a whole. Even if Iran ultimately succeeds in developing nuclear weapons, U.S. officials might find it very important to make the cost of such a program to be as high as possible in order to serve as an example to other would-be nuclear proliferator states. This systemic rationale might provide a reason to justify a covert campaign against Iran for years to come.

     Michael Eisenstadt then discussed the larger consequences of Iranian nuclear proliferation, comparing it to Pakistan, China, Russia, and North Korea and their practice of sharing weapon technology. In response to the threat posed by Iran, regional powers have significantly increased their conventional military forces as well as expressed interest in pursuing their own “civilian” nuclear programs. This regional militarization is inherently dangerous for stability and could have massive international implications. Iran wants to create the perception that its development of nuclear power is inevitable with the creation of covert facilities, the use of mixed messages and double entendres, and symbolic demonstrations, such as showing their missiles instead of nuclear weapons. Thus, the Iranians are already using their program as a deterrent against the United States and other regional opponents. Eisenstadt suggests that Iran’s other option is to create all of the necessary infrastructure for an atomic weapon without making the bomb itself. He suggests that at the moment Iran might not have the capability to create a weapon, but if they stockpile enriched uranium and delivery systems, then years down the road they can make one rapidly if need be. Ultimately, Iran would not have invested this much energy and capital as well as such faced harsh sanctions if they were not bent on creating nuclear weapons at some point. Eisenstadt believes that U.S. policy towards Iran needs to be reset in order for the United States to rebuild its credibility and force Iran to believe our threats. The recent attempt to engage in terrorism on American soil is an indication that Iran no longer fears U.S. military retribution.

     Guy Roberts, the next speaker, explained that the United States is already at war with Iran, from Iran’s involvement with Hizballah to the Quds Force activities in Iraq and Afghanistan. As a result, covert war should continue, but overt war is also a perfectly viable option. Iran is moving deeper into South America, specifically Venezuela and Bolivia. Thus, the United States needs to be more assertive to stop Iran’s global spread. The United States needs to address every facet of any potential Iranian offense and show Iran the true cost of its nuclear program. If the United States and NATO become more assertive and aggressive, then Iran would be forced to see the west’s threats as credible and possibly end their program. The European Union and NATO also need to present Iran with incentives to stop their nuclear weapons program. The carrot and stick approach must be fully utilized to ensure the security of NATO members, especially Turkey which is vulnerable to Iranian hostility. Roberts suggests that the United States and NATO may have to demonstrate the “teeth to our bite” if Iran continues to develop its weapons program. He believes the region needs a strong military commitment to ensure stability and act as a deterrent to other nations who may attempt to proliferate. Ultimately, this commitment could lead to a potential WMD free zone in the Middle East, which Roberts believes to be the best scenario for future stability and security.

     Professor Don Wallace, Jr., closed the individual presentation portion of the seminar. He agreed with many of the speakers that, apart from the specific challenge of Iran, the viability of the Nonproliferation Treaty must be ensured. He believes the Iranians to be an extremely proud and ambitious people, so even if there were regime change, a new regime may not stop their attempts to build a nuclear weapon. In his view, co-existing with a nuclear-armed Iran is a scenario that is completely unacceptable.

     Indeed, the foregoing insights discussed three years ago do provide a useful context to the latest seminar on “Tehran’s Bomb Challenge: Crossroads, Roadblocks, and Roadmaps to Rapproachment?” held on December 5, 2013, at Potomac Institute for Policy Studies. This event, moderated by Professor Yonah Alexander, consisted of a panel with Bijan R. Kian (highest ranking Iranian-American to serve two U.S. presidents, held other careers in both business and a former Senior Fellow, Naval Postgraduate School); Ambassador Noam Katz (former
Dr. Anthony Fainberg (former Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Director of Office of Policy and Planning for Aviation Security and
currently consultant for the Institute for Defense Analyses), and Dr. Emanuele Ottolenghi (Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and the author of The Pasdaran: Inside Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.).
As this report goes to press, several developments related to Iran during January-March 2014 are noteworthy:

     First, Saudi Arabia provided the Lebanese army a 3 billion dollar grant to counter Hizballah, Iran’s proxy.

     Second, the al-Qa’ida-linked Abdullah Azzam Brigades claimed responsibility for twin suicide bombings targeting the Iranian Cultural Center in Beirut in retaliation to Hizballah and Tehran’s role in the Syrian war.

     Third, Iran reported that it perfected multiple-warhead, medium-range ballistic missiles designed specifically to attack American targets. It also declared that the West “cannot entertain illusions” of Tehran completely ending its enrichment program.

     Fourth, the Israeli Navy seized the Klos-C, sailing under a Panamanian flag, in the Red Sea, off the coast of Sudan. The ship was carrying dozens of M-302 rockets intended for the Islamic Jihad in Gaza. This “arms export” operation was coordinated by Iran.
Ambassador of Israel to Nigeria and Ghana and currently Minister of Public Diplomacy at the
Israeli Embassy in Washington);

     And fifth, the U.S. Congress in bipartisan letters to President Obama asserted that in whatever a final agreement with Iran, the Islamic Republic must not retain any capability to pursue a nuclear weapon.

     Finally, an appreciation is due to Michael S. Swetnam (Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) and Professor Don Wallace, Jr. (Chairman, International Law Institute) who participated actively at the December 5, 2013, seminar. Additionally, the research background for this report was provided by the Winter 2013 and Spring 2014 team of graduate and undergraduate interns coordinated by Sharon Layani (University of Michigan). The team included James Nusse (The George Washington University), Michael Klement (University of Denver), Sheila Davis (Duquense University), William Docimo (London School of Economics), Stephanie Rieger (University of Wisconsin), David Wiese (University of Exeter), Kai Huntamer (University of California, Los Angeles), Courtney Van Wagner (University of Georgia), Garth Keffer (University of California, Davis), Roxanne Oroxom (University of Maryland), John Jermyn (University at Albany, the State University of New York), and G. Genghis Hallsby (University of Iowa). Mary Ann Culver prepared the manuscript for publication. All these individuals deserve special gratitude for their efficient support.

 

Cover IUCTS 2017On April 13,2017,the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies (IUCTS) published its eighth annual report, "Terrorism in North Africa and the Sahel in 2016," authored by Prof. Yonah Alexander, Director--IUCTS. The report finds the region & global community facing the most serious security challenges since 9/11, from natural and man-made threats. The rise of the Islamic State and the resilience of al-Qa’ida and their affiliates in Africa in 2016 have resulted in continued instability on the continent with a costly strategic impact inter-regionally. The study recommends the U.S. & allies engage more effectively to slow a security crisis that is erupting across Africa’s “arc of instability.”

Download the report here.

loneWbThe latest terrorist incidents in the U.S., Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and elsewhere, are once again a grim reminder of the expanding operational roles of "lone wolves." Whether they are self-radicalized or linked to home-grown or foreign groups, their involvement reflects a worrisome weakness in the security chain of modern society.

This February 2017 report on “The Lone Wolf Terrorist: Past Lessons, Future Outlook, and Response Strategies” focuses on some of the “lone wolf” challenges. These include security threats to the safety, welfare, and rights of ordinary people; the stability of the state system; the impact on national, regional, and global economic development; the expansion of democratic societies; and the prevention of the destruction of civilization by biological, chemical, and nuclear weapons.

Download the report here.

NatoNATO, as it marked its 68th anniversary, is still facing a broad range of old and new challenges, including piracy, terrorism, regional and global conflicts, humanitarian crises, proliferation of WMD, and cyber threats.

In light of these and other strategic concerns, the latest NATO Warsaw Summit in 2016 focused inter alia on strengthening and modernizing the Alliance’s deterrence and defense posture and projecting stability beyond its Eastern borders. The question arises whether the 28 nations’ partnership will continue to play its essential political and military role in the coming years.

This January 2017 report on “NATO’s Strategy: Continuity or Change?” provides a recent academic effort to analyze whether NATO, at this stage of its evolution, is capable of completing its transformation from an earlier static defense alliance into a more effective regional and global security provider.

Download the PDF here.

JerusalemCover2

As the new administration of President Donald J. Trump is beginning to develop its Middle East foreign policy strategy, the decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict still persists. In addition to the multiple outstanding issues to be resolved by the parties, such as the need for mutual recognition and the settling of boundary disputes, questions remain regarding the future of Jerusalem, the Holy City, which is considered by Israel as its eternal capital—and which the Palestinians also see as their own capital in a future state.

This current report on "The Holy Jerusalem: A Key to Middle East War or Peace?" provides a recent academic effort focusing on two questions. First, can religion in general serve as an effective bridge to advance the cause of peace in the Middle East and elsewhere? And second, will the antagonists and their partisan Jewish, Muslim, and Christian co-religionists be capable of a peaceful resolution on the final status of the Holy City?

Download the PDF here.

turkey2

In the wake of the failed coup in July 2016, many questions have arisen both domestically and internationally regarding Turkey’s future political, social, economic, and strategic direction. Among them are how will Turkey to continue to maintain a balance between security concerns and civil liberties domestically, as well as contribute to international efforts, including NATO’s mission, to advance stability regionally and globally.

This current report on “Post-Attempted Coup in Turkey: Quo Vadis?” provides a recent academic effort focusing on these issues as well as other related strategic concerns include the refugee crisis, the impact on the fight against the Islamic State, and Turkey’s relations with regional and global powers.

 

Download the PDF here.

roleofInfo1sm

The failure of contemporary societies during the past sixty years in the post-World War II period to effectively combat terrorism at home and abroad is, indeed, puzzling. After all, all nations are fully aware that the most critical element in combating the challenge of terrorism is intelligence. That is, the knowledge acquired, whether overtly or covertly, for the purpose of both internal and external statecraft.

And yet, despite this awareness, the grim reality is that terrorism is still attractive and works. For instance, according to recent press reports, during the past year and a half alone some 2,063 attacks were recorded in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia, with a death toll of 28,031. Likewise, 46 attacks occurred in Europe and the Americas, and as a result of which some 658 were killed.

The purpose of this introduction is to provide an academic context for the apparent lingering confusion regarding the nature and implications of intelligence in democracies. It presents a brief overview of the challenge of modern terrorism, outlines key aspects of the role of intelligence in confronting the threats at home and abroad, and reports on the two latest academic efforts in this security area that are incorporated in this study.

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roleofMilitaryThe role of force in the struggle for power within and among nations is a permanent fixture of international life. As James Madison observed during a debate on the adoption of the Constitution in 1787, “There never was a government without force.” Likewise, Sir Winston Churchill in a note to the First Sea Lord on October 15, 1942 remarked: “Superior force is a powerful persuader.”

Clearly, the primary actors capable of resorting to power domestically during periods of peace are the police and other law enforcement agencies. They are mandated to implement the preservation of public order, and thus represent the first layer of protection for civilians, including citizens, permanent residents, and visiting foreigners. These designated governmental bodies seek to encourage “good behavior,” prevent illegal activities, warnof potential internal threats, and develop strategies to assure an effective national security environment in accordance with the requirements of the administration of justice.

And yet, from time immemorial, military forces in particular have projected power at home and abroad during periods of both war and peace. It is not surprising therefore that there exists a comprehensive literature in this field, from antiquity to the contemporary era. Suffice to mention the infinite theological and secular sources covering the nature, role, and impact of armies on the direction of the statecraft of nations. For example, early religious texts focused on God’s directing military operations (e.g., assurance of victory),organizational structures (e.g., standing armies and mercenaries), arms supplies (e.g., slings, chariots, provisions), strategies and tactics (e.g., intelligence and spoils of war), and the virtues and vices of battles (e.g., magnanimity in victory and treatment of prisoners)...

Download the full PDF here.

Search All ICTS Events

Purpose and Scope

There exists the need to educate policy-makers, and the public in general, on the nature and intensity of the terrorism threat in the twenty-first century.  As a member of the academic and research community, the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies has an intellectual obligation, as well as a moral and practical responsibility, to participate in the international effort to arrest the virus of terrorism.  The purpose of the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies (IUCTS) is four-fold:

1. To monitor current and future threats of terrorism;

2. To develop response strategies on governmental and non-governmental levels;

3. To effect continual communication with policy-makers, academic institutions, business, media, and civic organizations;

4. To sponsor research programs on critical issues, particularly those relating enabling technologies with policy, and share findings nationally and internationally.

ICTS Events

  • Czech Republic-U.S. Strategic Partnership

    INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR TERRORISM STUDIES AT POTOMAC INSTITUTE FOR POLICY STUDIES "Czech Republic-U.S. Strategic Partnership" November 13, 2017 Since the establishment of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and the Czech Republic in 1993, both countries have created common approaches to address multiple challenges nationally, regionally, and globally. Ambassador Hynek Kmonicek provided a unique assessment of the nature of this strategic partnership, including a discussion on security concerns (e.g., NATO, Syria) as well as promoting economic…

  • Spanish-U.S. Strategic Partnership

    INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR TERRORISM STUDIES AT POTOMAC INSTITUTE FOR POLICY STUDIES "Spanish-U.S. Strategic Partnership" November 20, 2017 Spain’s role as a member of the UN, EU, and NATO as well as its strategic partnership with the U.S. has significant security implications regionally and globally. Ambassador Pedro Morenés, a former Minister of Defense, discussed the nature of these relationships and their future outlook. The Ambassador's Forum was moderated by Professor Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for…

  • Can the State System and Separatism Co-Exist?

    INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR TERRORISM STUDIES AT POTOMAC INSTITUTE FOR POLICY STUDIES "Can the State System and Separatism Co-Exist?" October 31, 2017 The political, social, economic, and strategic implications of the contemporary evolving trend of separatism in the name of self-determination is an emerging security concern nationally, regionally, and globally. The question is whether ethnic, racial, religious, and national movements seeking to establish distinct independent entities within their own homelands by various means will be forces…

On July 23rd, the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies hosted Seeing Ins't Always Believing: The Realities of Imaging Technology and Neuroscience. This seminar addressed the various ways in which neuroimaging technology has advanced, and how these new developments can be used to achieve the goals of the BRAIN Initiative. The President’s Initiative has spearheaded an effort to map and understand the human brain, and novel neuroimaging technologies need to be developed in order to accomplish this goal. Neuroimaging encompasses the set of techniques that researchers use to create a structural and/or functional map of the nervous system.

Speakers included Dr. Marvin Chun (Yale University), Dr. Paul Vaska (Brookhaven National Laboratory and Stony Brook University), and Dr. Jennifer Buss (Center of Neurotechnology Studies at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies.)

USS San Diego, At Sea, At Sea - Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO 187) refuels both the USS Makin Island, left, and the USS Comstock, right, as part of an underway replenishment in the Pacific Ocean, Aug. 4, 2014. The 11th MEU and Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group are a sea-based, expeditionary crisis response force capable of conducting amphibious missions across the full range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Rome M. Lazarus/Released) 

USMC Returning Commander Speaker Series Event

 

The Center for Adaptation and Innovation at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies hosted a program presented by the USMC Returning Commander Speaker Series on Thursday, 16 April 2015 featuring the commanders of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). During their seven month deployment, Captain Stephen McKone, USN, and Colonel Matthew Trollinger, USMC, led a Navy-Marine Corps team that completed missions that included conducting some of the first strikes in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, humanitarian assistance in the northwestern Hawaiian islands, and theater security cooperation exercises in Bangladesh, Malaysia, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia.

The year 2014 represents the most troubling security challenges since 9/11. With the escalation of violent attacks by an expanding array of terrorist groups, such as the emerging "Islamic State," the questions arises whether the worst is yet to come. Without more effective international cooperation to combat terrorism, the costs to the global community will continue to grow in 2015. The latest military operations led by Saudi Arabia in concert with its Gulf allies against the Houthi rebels in Yemen demonstrate the emerging strategic partnership trend. The Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies organized a panel of distinguished political, diplomatic, military, and academic experts to analyze last year's lessons, assess future threats, and offer "best practices" recommendations for the U.S. and its like-minded nations.

Since the dawn of history, women and children have represented the most vulnerable segments of societies. During the past several years, terrorist groups and state-sponsors have escalated targeting these populations including recruitment of members, explosions, kidnappings, conversions, slavery, rape, forced marriages, and murder. The brutalization and globalization of these expanded levels of violence are, indeed, unprecedented. On Friday, January 30th 2015 an expert panel met at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies to discuss the costs, lessons, future outlook, as well as related issues offering their insights and recommendations for “best practices” strategies to deal with this challenge. The opening remarks were presented by Michael S. Swetnam (CEO and Chairman, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies). The event was moderated by Professor Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies). Panelists were Dr. Kathleen Kuehnast (Director, Center for Gender & Peacebuilding, United States Institute of Peace), Professor Patricia A. Maulden (Associate Professor of Conflict Resolution and Director, Dialogue & Difference Project, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University), Nina Shea (Director, Center for Religious Freedom, Hudson Institute and international human-rights lawyer for over thirty years), Professor Michael Noone (The Catholic University of America’s Columbus School of Law), Dr. Mir Sadat (Professor of National Security and Foreign Policy, National Intelligence University). Closing remarks were presented by General (Ret.) Alfred Gray (Twenty-Ninth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Board of Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies.

Ambassador (Ret.) Paul Bremer III was the keynote speaker at a special seminar “America, Still the Indispensable Nation”, held at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies on January 15, 2015. Mr. Bremer's diplomatic service spanned almost 40 years under eight presidents. During his tours in Washington, Bremer was Special Assistant to six Secretaries of State including service as Henry Kissinger's Chief of Staff. His overseas assignments included Afghanistan, Malawi, and Norway. President Reagan appointed him Ambassador to the Netherlands (1983-86) and then Ambassador at Large for Counter Terrorism (1986-89). After leaving government service, Bremer was Managing Director of Kissinger Associates, a strategic consulting firm headed by the former Secretary of State and subsequently Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Marsh Crisis Consulting Company, a firm providing crisis management advice and training to corporate boards and CEOs. A recognized expert in counter terrorism, in 1999 Bremer was appointed Chairman of the Bipartisan National Commission on Terrorism. The Commission reported to President Clinton in 2000 that the United States faced a growing threat from Islamic extremism. After 9/11, President Bush appointed Bremer to the President's Homeland Security Advisory Commission. In 2003 the president recalled Bremer to government service as Presidential Envoy to Iraq charged with beginning the country's political and economic reconstruction. Bremer's best - selling book, My Year in Iraq: The Struggle to Build a Future of Hope, was published in 2006. Bremer has received numerous awards for his public service. In 2004, President Bush awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award, for his service in Iraq. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on the Board of the RAND Corporation's Center for Middle East Public Policy. He is Chairman of the Sustainable Systems International, and a director of Alelo, a California - based technology firm. He also serves on the Boards of The Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East, the AMAR Foundation, the Chester Historical Foundation and the Fort at Number 4 in Charlestown, New Hampshire. Ambassador Bremer was the Founder and President of the Lincoln/ Douglass Scholarship Foundation, a Washington-based non-profit organization that provided high school scholarships to inner city youths. Bremer received his B.A. from Yale University, a CEP from the Institut D'Etudes Politiques of the University of Paris, and an MBA from Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. He has an Honorary Doctor of Law degree from Ave Maria University. Opening remarks were presented by General (Ret.) Alfred Gray (Twenty-Ninth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Board of Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) and the event was moderated by Professor Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies).

The latest Taliban school attack in Pakistan, the “lone wolf” café siege in Australia, and the beheading of Christian children by Islamic State members have once again demonstrated the brutalization of terrorism in “the name of God.” Despite the upsurge of contemporary theological-based threats, is religion still relevant in combating radicalization and extremism on national, regional, and global levels? Also, what are the “best-practice” strategies in minimizing religious confrontations and maximizing ecumenical inter-faith relations? A panel of academics, clergy, and former policy makers discuss these and related questions. The event was moderated by Professor Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies). Panelists were Professor Robert Eisen (Professor of Religion and Judaic Studies and Chair of the Department of Religion at the George Washington University), Issam Michael Saliba (Senior Foreign Law Specialist for the Middle East and North Africa, Law Library of Congress), Dr. Sayyid M. Syeed (National Director of the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA) heading up its Office for Interfaith and Community Alliances in Washington, DC. He is one of the founders of the American Journal of Islamic Social Sciences (AJISS) and served as Editor and then Editor-in-Chief (1984-1994)), Rabbi Stuart Weinblatt (President of the Rabbinic Cabinet of the Jewish Federations of North America. He served as Director of Israel Policy and Advocacy for the Rabbinical Assembly (2009-2014). He is the rabbi of Congregation B’nai Tzedek in Potomac, Maryland), Tina Ramirez (President, Hardwired Inc. Former policy researcher at the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom and a foreign policy advisor for various members of the U.S. Congress where she helped found and direct the bi-partisan Congressional International Religious Freedom Caucus) and Dr. Maryann Cusimano Love (Associate Professor of International Relations in the Politics Department of the Catholic University of America. She is on the Core Group for the Department of State's working group on Religion and Foreign Policy and served as a Fellow at the Commission on International Religious Freedom). Professor Don Wallace, Jr. (Chairman, International Law Institute) made the closing remarks.

The public debate over the military's role in combating terrorism directed against the Islamic State and other adversaries is intensifying. From Washington to Istanbul to Canberra, policy makers are currently considering both defensive and offensive strategies for the short and long term security challenges. A distinguished panel of military, diplomatic, and academic experts discuss a broad range of topics including threat analysis, crisis management, and unilateral and collective tactical responses. General (Ret.) Alfred Gray (Twenty-Ninth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Board of Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) presented the opening remarks and the event was moderated by Professor Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies). The keynote speaker was Brigadier General Richard C. Gross, U.S. Army (Legal Counsel to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Panelists were Brigadier General (Ret.) David Reist (USMC Operation Iraqi Freedom, Deputy Commanding General for Governance and Economics in Anbar Province from February 2006-February 2007 and Vice President, Strategy and Planning Division, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies), Dr. Lawrence J. Korb (Senior Fellow at American Progress, Senior Advisor to the Center for Defense Information, and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University) and Dr. Alaa Abdalaziz (Political Counselor, Embassy of the Arab Republic of Egypt in the U.S. Former Charge d'affaires, Embassy of the Arab Republic of Egypt in Syria (2012-2014)). Professor Don Wallace, Jr. (Chairman, International Law Institute) made the closing remarks.

In light of the history of the Cold War and the current Ukraine crisis, can we draw practical lessons for future peace-making policies in Europe and their implications for global stability? The International Center for Terrorism Studies hosted a seminar on “The Ukraine Crisis: Quo Vadis?” on November 6, 2014. A panel of current and former government officials and academic experts offered political and strategic perspectives on a critical security concern for the international community. Michael S. Swetnam (CEO and Chairman, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) made opening remarks and Professor Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) moderated the event. The panel included Yaroslav Brisiuck (Deputy Chief of Mission, Minister-Counselor, Embassy of Ukraine), Ian Brzezinski (Formerly Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Europe and NATO Policy and currently Resident Senior Fellow, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council), and Klaus Botzet (Head of the Political, Security and Development Section, Delegation of the European Union to the United States of America). Dr. Patrick Murphy (Former U.S. government official, including in the Office of the Secretary of State, and currently Visiting Fellow, Inter-University Center for Legal Studies) provided commentary analysis and General (Ret.) Alfred Gray (Twenty-Ninth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Board of Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) made closing remarks.

From time immemorial natural and man-made disasters have become permanent fixtures of human life. The latest alarming reports on the spread of the Ebola virus in Africa and its reach elsewhere as well as the grave humanitarian crisis resulting from the Islamic State (IS) blitzkrieg in the Middle East have raised an urgent question whether the international community is adequately prepared to cope with these security concerns. The International Center for Terrorism Studies hosted a seminar on “Health Security Challenges and Responses: From Ebola to Terrorism” on October 31, 2014. General (Ret.) Alfred Gray (Twenty-Ninth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Board of Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) made opening remarks and Professor Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) moderated the event. The panel included Dr. Robert Kadlec (Former senior official at the White House, Pentagon, and U.S. Senate), Dr. Rashid A. Chotani (The George Washington University, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies), and Professor Larry Velte (Former Deputy Chief of the Middle East Division in the Joint Staff's Strategic Plans and Policy Directorate and Associate Professor at the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies (NESA) at the National Defense University). Professor Don Wallace, Jr. (Chairman, International Law Institute) made closing remarks. This panel of experts from the public and private sectors focused on current and future health related disasters. They also provided “best-practices” policy recommendations both on national and global levels.

Click Here for C-SPAN Coverage

 

In light of the latest hostilities in Ukraine, Syria, Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan, Gaza, and elsewhere, are the laws of armed conflict still relevant? Do the current sources of law and their enforcement systems urgently need a comprehensive reconsideration in order to serve the causes of stability, peace, and justice?

Is the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) emerging as a new terrorist “super power”?  According to its publicized projected “Five-Year Plan,” a Sunni Caliphate will be established over the Middle East, Africa, and Europe by 2019.  Should the international community be concerned about these potential expansionist plans, and what can be done to defeat ISIS?

The International Center for Terrorism Studies hosted a seminar on "Post-Europe's Parliament Elections 2014: Political, Social, Economic, and Security Implications" on July 30, 2014. Topics discussed at the seminar included employment and migration policies, combating racism and terrorism, the Ukraine crisis, Middle East challenges, and transatlantic relations. Professor Don Wallace, Jr. (Chairman, International Law Institute) and Eric Fusfield (Deputy Director of the B'nai B'rith International Center for Human Rights and Public Policy) made opening remarks. Professor Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) moderated the event. The panel included Dr. Robert A. Pollard (Senior Foreign Service Officer with 30 years of international experience, including service in Europe and Visiting State Department Fellow, Europe Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies), Peter Roudik (Director, Global Legal Research Center, Law Library of Congress), Professor Amit Kumar (Adjunct Associate Professor at Georgetown University) and Geoffrey Harris (Deputy Head of the European Parliament's Liaison Office with the U.S. Congress and formerly Head of the Human Rights Unit within the Secretariat General of the European Parliament (Directorate General for external policies DGEXPO)).

The ICTS at the Potomac Institute hosted a forum on “The Middle East Crisis: Updates on Strategic Challenges and Opportunities” on July 25, 2014. General (Ret.) Alfred Gray (Twenty-Ninth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Board of Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) made opening remarks and Professor Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies) moderated the event. The panel includes Brigadier General David Reist, USMC (Ret.) (Operation Iraqi Freedom, Deputy Commanding General for Governance and Economics in Anbar Province from February 2006-February 2007 and Vice President, Strategy and Planning Division, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies), Oren Marmorstein (Counselor for Public and Academic Affairs, Embassy of Israel), and Dr. Judith Yaphe (Former senior analyst on Near East Persian Gulf issues in the Office of Near Eastern and South Asian Analysis, Directorate of Intelligence, CIA, currently, a professor at the Elliot School of International Affairs at the George Washington University). This panel of experts provided political and military updated assessments clarifying the complex security situation in the region and beyond.

Africa matters to the United States and to its friends and allies for reasons ranging from its strategic geographic position to the threats posed by radicalization and violence to the vast economic opportunities and resources it offers. While the international community is currently focusing on crises in the Ukraine, Syria, and elsewhere, the security challenges in Africa also deserve much greater attention.  

On March 20 the Center for Revolutionary Scientific Thought (CReST) hosted a Bold Ideas Seminar featuring the Honorable Zachary J. Lemnios.  Potomac Institute CEO and Chairman, Michael Swetnam, introduced and gave a brief overview of the 2014 thrust areas for CReST. In the Hon. Lemnios' presentation he discussed how his career in government, especially at DARPA and as Director of Defense Research and Engineering, shaped his current career in the private sector.  Specifically, he addressed the future of Information Technology and the different areas of computing that IBM is placing bets on.      

Industries are moving to a new data economy that will be characterized by predictive analytics, all-source understanding, seamless global connectivity, speed, and agility.  As head of IBM's network of global research laboratories the Hon. Lemnios mentioned launching major initiatives to develop systems of insight, cognitive computing, secure micro cloud, and managed data services. He highlighted recent investments with the New York Genome Center and in the Watson program. Lastly, he proffered a challenge to the audience to come up with Watson's next demonstration of intelligence.

CReST hosts seminars and conferences designed to find and foster big, bold science and technology ideas that address the most trying challenges facing our society. Notable scientists and technology thought leaders discuss their concepts in the Bold Ideas forum series to an invited audience of science and technology decision-makers in agencies and departments across the US Government, industry, and academia.

On Friday, March 21, members of the science and policy communities met to discuss the current challenges and opportunities in neuroscience data sharing as well as possible ways to advance data sharing going forward.  Panelists included representatives from the neuroscience, industry, statistics, database, funding, and scientific journal communities.


 
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/45123621

 

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/45129645

 

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/45132814

 

Security concerns at the Sochi Olympics are a just one facet of security issues globally, and the current events provide a valuable opportunity to discuss the challenges and potential for the way ahead.

The Potomac Institute co-sponsored an event at the International Law Institute Feb. 20 titled “Olympics Security Lessons: From Munich to Sochi” to look at the many security challenges, including cyber and physical, as well as the legal framework through which to view the challenges.

Video of the event is available via C-Span:

http://www.c-span.org/video/?317907-1/security-olympics

 

It can also be viewed here:

 

 

www.ustream.tv/recorded/44250367


 

For almost 40 years Spain has been victimized by domestic ETA violence. In 2004, Al Qa’ida perpetrated a devastating terrorist attack in Madrid.

Ambassador Ramón Gil-Casares, Ambassador of Spain to the United States of America, discussed both the threats and responses, particularly focusing on Spain’s contributions to security concerns nationally and globally.

Video from the Feb. 7 event is available here:

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/43545042
 

The 16th Annual Event On
“International Cooperation in Combating Terrorism:
Review of 2013 and Outlook for 2014”
PIPS
The year 2013 represents the most troubling security challenge since 9/11, with the largest number of terrorist attacks occurring across the world. The battle we are waging is generational, institutional, and unavoidable. Without more effective international cooperation the cost to the global community will continue to grow in 2014.

A panel of political, military, and academic experts analyzed last year’s lessons, assessed anticipated threats in 2014 and beyond, and offered strategic recommendations for the international community.

Video is available now:

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/43107698

The Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) is allegedly a group of hackers supporting the Syrian government of Bashar al Assad. Its tactics include denial of service attacks, defacements and spamming campaigns.  Observers debate whether it is directly supported by the Damascus government; however, Assad has publicly praised the group.  It targets Syrian rebels and other perceived enemies of the Assad regime, particularly news outlets.  Apparent targets have included the BBC, AP, NPR, Financial Times, Washington Post and al-Jazeera.

Dr. Gabi Siboni, Director of the Military and Strategic Affairs Program at the Institute for National Security Studies in Tel Aviv, shared his analysis of the SEA background and structure, capabilities, political motivations and discussed why America should take the SEA seriously.

Potomac Institute CEO Mike Swetnam opened the discussion.  Closing remarks were provided by Amb. David J. Smith, Potomac Institute Senior Fellow and Cyber Center Director; and Mr. Paul DeSouza, founder and Director, Cyber Security Forum Initiative.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/41818354

Video of Event Available:  Kearsarge ARG and 26th MEU Commanders Review Deployment

Current events in the Middle East were a focus for the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) during a recent eight-month deployment, and the Navy and Marine Corps personnel were ready for exercises in Jordan, ongoing conflict in Syria, and increased tension in Egypt.

The military commanders of the two units discussed challenges related to current events, logistics and equipment during a brief at the Potomac Institute Dec. 5.  Navy Capt. Jim Cody commands the Kearsarge ARG, and Marine Corps Col. Matthew St. Clair commands the 26th MEU.  The three-ship ARG included about 4,000 Sailors and Marines and the 26th MEU.

The two commanders also discussed the mix of old and new equipment they used during the deployment, specifically the air assets – from helicopters to unmanned aerial vehicles.  Changes in technology for ships and aircraft will change the face of the deploying units in the future, as they prepare for missions ranging from combat to logistics to search and rescue. 

The next big decks amphibious ship will not have a well deck for smaller surface vehicles to bring heavy equipment to the shore, so that equipment will have to be lighter for air assets to carry it.  Heavier equipment will have to be forward staged or brought in by larger Military Sealift Command ships.

The video of the brief and questions/answers is available here:  http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/41782902

Experts from U.S. Government, Academia Discussed Challenges, History, And More

In light of the growing debate over the Geneva deal with Iran as illustrated by the Senate’s move toward a new sanctions bill, a panel of experts discussed many issues including the nuclear “red line” status, options for future trade-offs negotiations, and short and long term regional and global strategic implications.

The Honorable Bijan R. Kian, the highest ranking Iranian-American to serve two U.S. presidents, was the keynote speaker.

Video from the event is now available.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/41747579

Panel Addresses Security Challenges of a New, Permanent Fixture

Although lone wolf terrorism, as perpetrated by individuals in Oklahoma City, Fort Hood, and Oslo, has become a permanent fixture of security concerns nationally and globally, the phenomenon is not very well understood. A panel of experts discussed the nature of the growing threat and what modern societies can do to reduce the risks.

Michael S. Swetnam, CEO and Chairman, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies offered opening remarks, and the panel was moderated by Prof. Yonah Alexander, Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies.

Panelist speakers included: 
Marion (Spike) Bowman, Former Deputy General Counsel (National Security), Federal Bureau of Investigation; Distinguished Fellow, Center for National Security Law, University of Virginia School of Law
Prof. Amit Kumar, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University
Kyle B. Olson, President, The Olson Group, Ltd.

Prof. Don Wallace Jr., Chairman, International Law Institute, provided closing remarks.

The video is can be viewed here:

  http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/41110278

Crime & Terrorism Converge: 

The growing nexus between gangs and terrorism has resulted in a unique type of threat. Since the 1980s, evidence of narcotics trade has been linked to terrorism and transnational organized crime.

Experts from law enforcement, Drug Enforcement Agency and Security and Intelligence backgrounds discussed the links between criminal activity and groups with terrorist acts and organizations; the political and economic effects of crime and terrorism on a national level; the need for policy to put distance and separation between the worst criminal groups and the worst terrorist organizations; and the similar characteristics and motivations that drive individuals to join criminal and terrorist groups.

Operating without borders and in areas of government instability, Latin American gangs, such as MS-13, and Mexican cartels have been financing terrorist operations through the drug trade. In the United States, Los Angeles gangs have been linked to Hezbollah and Minnesota groups have been linked to Al-Shabaab. Narco-trafficking is a lucrative business and terrorist organizations such as the FARC, Hezbollah, and al-Qa'ida take advantage of this black market.

Panelists included Mark Stainbrook, Assistant Chief, San Diego Harbor Police; Vanda Felbab-Brown, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, Brookings Institution; and Anthony Placido, Principal, Booz Allen Hamilton and Former Assistant Administrator for Intelligence, Drug Enforcement Agency. 

This discussion is available for viewing in two parts:

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/40998123

   
 

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/41000035
 

A critical element of counterterrorism strategy is the role of intelligence. A panel of experts discussed important questions on this timely topic at a recent seminar, including: What is the price for democratic concerns, including issues such as metadata, detention, interrogation, renditions, prosecutions, and punishment?  Can less liberty equal more security? What is the cost to international cooperation in combating terrorism in light of the NSA revelations? Can counterterrorism policies strike a balance between security and freedom?

Professor Yonah Alexander, Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies; and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, moderated the event.  The panel included Ambassador Javier Ruperez,  Former Ambassador of Spain to the United States, and Assistant Secretary-General and Director of Counterterrorism at the United Nations Security Council; Marc Norman, Director for Africa, Europe and the Americas, Bureau of Counterterrorism, U.S. Department of State; Dr. Wayne H. Zaideman,  Former FBI Legal Attaché in the Middle East; Peter Roudik,  Assistant Director of Legal Research and Chief, Eastern Law Division at the Law Library of Congress; and Margarita Assenova,  Director of Programs for the Balkans, Caucasus & Central Asia, The Jamestown Foundation.

Several organizations co-sponsored the event:  The Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies; the International Center for Terrorism Studies, at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies; the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies, at the International Law Institute; and the Center for National Security Law, University of Virginia School of Law.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/40634247

Security issues relating to chemical weapons and military nuclear capability were the main topics at a recent seminar on "Reassessing the WMD Challenges:  The Next Phase?"

A panel of experts looked at the foremost security concerns in the Middle East and beyond, which are the future outlook for the dismantlement of Syria’s chemical weapons and preventing Iran from obtaining military nuclear capability.  The panel and the audience examined whether the issues can be resolved peacefully;  the panel also assessed tactical and strategic perspectives for the coming months.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies co-sponsored the event with the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies; the International Center for Terrorism Studies, at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies; the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies, at the International Law Institute; and the Center for National Security Law, University of Virginia School of Law.

The seminar can be viewed here.

Sometime between the summers of 2009 and 2010, a computer worm that came to be known as Stuxnet destroyed about 1,000 centrifuges at Iran's Natanz (nuclear) Fuel Enrichment Plant.  The mission hinged upon superb intelligence, keen understanding of how the Natanz facility worked, and perfect delivery.  Stuxnet was historic because it fulfilled the century-old quest for exquisite targeting that began with the advent of powered flight.  Smith combines history and contemporary developments to weave a strategic fabric with important future implications.

Amb. David J. Smith, Senior Fellow and Cyber Center Director, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, opened the discussion.  Mr. John Toomer was commentator; Toomer is Director of Intelligence, Information and Cyber Systems, Government Operations, The Boeing Company.  Mr. Toomer is a retired USAF Colonel with extensive experience in cyber matters.  He was also Associate Professor at the US Army Command and Staff College where he taught courses on the development of airpower.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/40273979

International cooperation is a key strategy in combating terrorism. And yet, the NSA revelations and the controversy over the latest U.S. raids in Libya and Somalia, as well as escalated drone operations in Yemen, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, have raised questions regarding U.S. intelligence sharing, the rule of law, and partnership collaboration with other nations.

A panel of experts provided an assessment of future policies and actions anticipated in response to terrorism at home and abroad.

The event was cosponsored by the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies; The International Center for Terrorism Studies, at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies; The Inter-University Center for Legal Studies, at the International Law Institute; and The Center for National Security Law, University of Virginia School of Law.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/40134244

General (ret.) Alfred Gray, Twenty-Ninth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; Senior Fellow and Chairman of the Board of Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, provided opening remarks, noting the 30th anniversary of the attack on the military barracks in Lebanon, which killed 241 U.S. military members.  

Prof. Yonah Alexander, Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies,  moderated the panel.

Panel members included Dr. Michael S. Bell, Colonel, U.S. Army (Retired) and Chancellor, The College of International Security Affairs, National Defense University; Greg Gross, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense and senior staff member, U.S. Senate, currently a consultant on foreign policy and military affairs; and Dr Harlan K. Ullman, Senior Advisor at the Atlantic Council and Chairman of the Killowen Group.

International Cooperation in Combating Terrorism: An Updated U.S. Assessment

Thursday, October 24, 2013

International Center for Terrorism Studies, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies

________________________________________________________________________

Speakers Biographies:

Potomac Institute hosted a panel of experts to discuss International Cooperation in Combating Terrorism.  Considered as context, as the UN General Assembly is convening for its 68th session, combating terrorism is a key agenda item.  The current status and future oulook of security cooperation in light of the Kenya attack implications were discussed. 

CEO and Chairman Michael Swetnam offered opening remarks, and Prof. Yonah Alexander (Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies and Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute) moderated the discussion.  Speakers included:

- Ambassador Mohammed Alhussaini Alsharif, Ambassador of the League of Arab States to the United States.

- Ambassador Al Maamoun Baba Lamine Keita, Ambassador of the Republic of Mali to the United States.

- Hon. Simonas Satunas, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Lithuania.  Lithuania is currently holding the Presidency of the European Union.

Prof. Down Wallace, Jr., Chairman, International Law Institute, offered closing remarks.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/39290702

During a presentation at The Potomac Institute, Dr. Victoria Keener, Research Fellow at the East-West Center in Honolulu, assessed the state of climate knowledge, its impacts, and adaptive capacity in the Pacific region. She highlighted the critical importance of accurate and consistent data collection on climate change and focused on impacts to disaster preparedness, national security, food and water security, and immigration.  Underinvestment in the systems that gather data on climate in the Pacific region weakens research.  This in turn impacts the predictability profiles that affect food and water security, which can result in increased numbers of climate migrants.  It also makes it more difficult to get policymakers the information needed to make decisions on how to address the effects of climate change.  Partnerships between scientists and decision makers are crucial to understand the impacts of climate change. 

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/39019167

Dr. Rita Colwell speaks at the CReST Bold Ideas Seminar series -- "Climate Change and Human Health:  Prospects for the Future."  http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/38651619

 

The video webcast from the Sept. 11, 2013, seminar on "The Anniversary of 9/11: Lessons Learned" is available to watch.  www.ustream.tv/recorded/38600939

Video from the Aug 27 seminar on "The Terrorists-Prisoners Challenge:  Lessons Learned and Future Outlook" is available to watch:

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/37883065

 

 

Cyber Video

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/34494589

Equipment Reset: Getting the Marine Corps Down to Fighting Weight.

 

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies held a conference, Equipment Reset: Getting the Marine Corps Down to Fighting Weight, on Wednesday, April 17. Event was lead by LtGen William M. Faulkner, USMC, Deputy Commandant, Installations and Logistics. He discussed the future changes the Marine Corps will be making with downsizing equipment.

The challenges of becoming a lighter and more agile force, while understanding requirements and increased weights and demands, is a daily issue for LtGen William Faulkner, Deputy Commandant for Installations and Logistics for the U.S. Marine Corps.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies will host a program presented by the USMC Returning Commander speaker series on Wednesday, January 16, from 3-4:30 pm at the Institute, by the commanders of the USS Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group (IWO JIMA ARG) and the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). During a nine-month deployment, CAPT Art Garcia, USN, and Col Frank Donovan, USMC, led a Navy-Marine Corps team that completed missions across the Middle East, the Persian Gulf, Africa and Southwest Asia. Registration is required: please see below for details.

The IWO JIMA ARG/24 MEU includes the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima, the amphibious transport dock USS New York, and the amphibious dock landing ship USS Gunston Hall. More than 4,000 Sailors and Marines embarked in March 2012 on the deployment, which was extended in November amid ongoing turmoil in the Middle East.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies' International Center for Terrorism Studiesl hosted a roundtable discussion,  Middle East Security Concerns: The Next Phase? on Monday, December 10, from 12 noon-2 pm at the Institute.    Co-sponsors of this event included the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies and the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies of the International Law Institute.   This event was covered by C-SPAN:  click here to watch the C-SPAN video in its entirety.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies held a special conference, A National Cyber Doctrine:  The Time Is Now, on Tuesday, December 4, at The National Press Club. The event featured the release of the new book from the Potomac Institute Press, #CyberDoc: No Borders - No Boundaries.  The book is co-edited by Potomac Institute CEO and Chairman Michael Swetnam and by Timothy Sample, Vice President and Sector Manager for Battelle Memorial Institute’s Special  Programs Organization, who also serves as a member of the Institute’s Board of Regents.  The book is available on Amazon.com:  click here for the Amazon listing.

Panelists at the December 4 event addressed the urgent need for a cyber doctrine to guide US policy in an era of proliferating cyber challenges to our national security, even as Congress and the White House struggle to find a way forward.  Formulating such a doctrine is made more complicated by the numerous "gray areas" in which national and private interests overlap, lack of clarity about which government entities should assume responsibility for cyber security, and the limited utility of past paradigms (such as the circumstances surrounding creation of a nuclear policy) in the current climate.  Click on the attachment to read a transcript of the event.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies' International Center for Terrorism Studies held a special conference, Maritime Security: Threat Assessments and Response Strategies, on Thursday, November 29, from 10 am - 5 pm at the Institute.   Maritime security is at the heart of the US economy and is critical to its military concerns. Piracy and terrorism on the high seas challenge freedom of navigation and the safety interests of global commerce. At this special, day-long event, government officials and private experts assessed current and future threats and discuss American and international response strategies in the maritime environment. Click below to watch video of the event.

Please note: The views of guest speakers are the speakers' alone and do not represent the views of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies or its staff.  The Potomac Institute is a non-partisan, not-for-profit research organization dedicated to the free exchange of ideas for the purpose of informing public policy.

Co-sponsors of this event include the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies and the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies of the International Law Institute.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies' International Center for Terrorism Studies hosted a panel discussion, Diplomatic Security:  Past Lessons and Future Outlook, on Thursday, September 27, at the Institute.  Co-sponsors of this event included the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies and the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies of the International Law Institute.

The attacks on US diplomatic facilities abroad, and the killing of US Ambassador Christopher Stevens, raise troubling questions about the state of diplomatic security in today's world.  A panel of experts examined these recent events.  Click below to watch video of the program.

 

 

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies and National Security Partners co-host a panel discussion, Addressing the Supply Chain Threat, on Wednesday, September 26.  The event was covered by C-SPAN.  Click here to access C-SPAN's video of the event in its entirety.

Panelists included the following special guests: Dennis Bartko, Director's Special Assistant for Cyber, National Security Agency; Melissa Hathaway, former Acting Senior Director for Cyberspace, US National Security Council; and Brett Lambert, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manufacturing and the Industrial Base.

Click below to watch archived video from our webcast.

Please note: The views of guest speakers are the speakers' alone and do not represent the views of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies or its staff. The Potomac Institute is a non-partisan, not-for-profit research organization dedicated to the free exchange of ideas for the purpose of informing public policy.

 

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies'  International Center for Terrorism Studies hosted a luncheon seminar, Inevitable Last Resort: Syria or Iran First? on Tuesday, September 11, at the Institute.  Co-sponsors of this event included the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies and the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies of the International Law Institute. Panelists asked whether the expanding civil war in Syria and its grave humanitarian crisis call for immediate international intervention, whether Iran’s potential crossing of a nuclear weapon “red line” will inevitably trigger unilateral or multilateral military strikes, and whether diplomacy still offers urgent “honorable exit” options to avoid “doomsday” scenarios in the Middle East. Click below to watch a video of the event.

Please note: The views of guest speakers are the speakers' alone and do not represent the views of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies or its staff.  The Potomac Institute is a non-partisan, not-for-profit research organization dedicated to the free exchange of ideas for the purpose of informing public policy.

 

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies' International Center for Terrorism Studies will host a panel discussion, "Turkey's Partnership for Security: The Next Phase," from 12 noon - 2 pm on Tuesday, August 28, at the Institute. Co-sponsors of this event include the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies and the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies of the International Law Institute. There will be a live webcast of this event:  click here to access our Live Events Stream page.  Attendance is by registration only;  please see below for details.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies' International Center for Terrorism Studies hosted a panel discussion, "Combating Olympic Terrorism:  National and International Lessons," on Wednesday, July 25, 2012.  Panelists addressed concerns over the safety of the London Olympics, asking whether the lessons drawn from previous Games will suffice to prevent or mitigate potential terrorist threats. The panel discussed several security issues, including intelligence, law enforcement, legal aspects, economic costs, media coverage and international implications.  Click below to watch video of the event. Click on the attachment to read a summary of the event.

Potomac Institute for Policy Studies Senior Fellow Amb. David Smith (Ret.) is the Director of the Potomac Institute Cyber Center.  He is a cyber security and cyber policy analyst, a former US arms negotiator, and an expert on Russian cyber capabilities.  Amb. Smith will be a featured speaker at the July 19 US Cybersecurity Threats and Responses Conference, hosted by the American Foreign Policy Council, at the Rayburn House Office Building. His talk will be entitled "The Russian Cyber Threat to US National Security."  Click here for more information.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies' International Center for Terrorism Studies held a special panel discussion, Middle East Security and the Changing International Partnership, on June 28, 2012, at The National Press Club in Washington, DC.  Co-sponsors of this event were B'nai B'rith International, the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, and the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies at the International Law Institute.  Panelists examined the unfolding security challenges in the Middle East, including uncertainties in the aftermath of the Arab Spring, civil war in Syria, and Iran's nuclear ambitions. Click below to watch a video of the event.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies' International Center for Terrorism Studies hosted a luncheon panel discussion, "Al-Qa'ida: Quo Vadis?" on Monday, April 30. The death of Usama bin Laden on May 2, 2011, signified a major milestone for the United States and the international community’s war against terrorism.  On the first anniversary of “Operation Neptune Spear,” an assessment of short- and long-term strategic and tactical lessons learned was offered by a team of experts who have been studying and combating al-Qa’ida for the past twenty years. Click below to watch archived webcast video of the event, or click here to watch C-SPAN coverage of the event..

Please note: The views of guest speakers are the speakers' alone and do not represent the views of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies or its staff.  The Potomac Institute is a non-partisan, not-for-profit research organization dedicated to the free exchange of ideas for the purpose of informing public policy.

Co-sponsors of this event included the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies and the Inter-University Center for Legal Studies of the International Law Institute.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies was pleased to present a briefing by Major General John A. Toolan, Jr., USMC, Commanding General, II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), on Monday, April 23.  This event was part of the USMC Returning Commander speaker series. MajGen Toolan recently completed a year-long deployment in Afghanistan. Under his leadership, Marines and coalition forces supported NATO and ISAF efforts in Afghanistan. Click below to watch a video of the program.

Please note: The views of guest speakers are the speakers' alone and do not represent the views of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies or its staff.  The Potomac Institute is a non-partisan, not-for-profit research organization dedicated to the free exchange of ideas for the purpose of informing public policy.

ICTS Books

In this breakthrough book, General Al Gray and Dr. Paul Otte provide a new model for achieving a higher level of leadership. This book validates the struggles of the Conflicted Leader – one who must lead individuals and organizations as our world moves through ever-evolving waves of change. But, the authors do more than address what many leaders today are experiencing. They propose a new way of making a difference though Vantage Leadership, defined as the ability to embrace uncertainty, see the possible over the probable, remain conceptual through conflict, and more.

“If you only look for leadership in the usual places, you will only find the usual leadership.”

FrontCoverOtte800web


PRAISE FOR

The Conflicted Leader and Vantage Leadership

“In 1989, the U.S. Marine Corps promulgated a small book entitled Warfighting for all Marines. The intent was to describe General Al Gray’s philosophy on warfighting and to encourage leaders at all levels to use the Maneuver Warfare concepts and values as a way of thinking to meet the challenges of both combat and life. Now General Gray and Dr. Paul Otte have taken these principles and applied them to the everyday challenges of leadership in a complex and uncertain world.  Understanding and using the concepts in this book will serve well all who aspire to lead and succeed at any level”

– Brent Scowcroft
Air Force Lt. General (Ret) and former National Security Advisor to President Gerald Ford and President George H.W. Bush

“General Al Gray’s leadership profoundly changed the US Marine Corps, US policy, and the way the US Military fights today in hundreds of ways. His unique form of leadership inspires all who come in contact with him. General Gray and Dr. Paul Otte have successfully outlined these principles of leadership in a fashion that will continue to inspire and guide people for generations to come.”

– Michael S. Swetnam
CEO and Chairman
Potomac Institute for Policy Studies

The Conflicted Leader and Vantage Leadership provides a fresh perspective to the study of leadership, providing a basis for developing leadership concepts, ideas, and ideals that apply to you. This book is a “must read” for the serious student of leadership.

– Robert L. Bailey
Retired CEO, Chairman and President – State Auto Insurance Companies
Author of “Plain Talk About Leadership”

“The Marine Warfighting philosophy published by General Gray in 1989 contains concepts, values, and wisdom that helped transform the Marine Corps. Now, General Gray and his writing partner Dr. Paul Otte have captured these thoughts in a superb book. If you want to know why the Marines win – read this. You can us the same principles in your in your business or professional life.”

– David C. Miller, Jr.
Ambassador of the United Sates (Retired) 
and former Special Assistant to President George H. W. Bush

“General Gray and Dr. Otte have advanced significantly the discourse on leadership for our modern age. Happily, one will not find in this work any endorsement of manipulative leadership so in evidence today, with its reliance on testing issues and words through focus groups before positions are articulated and ‘leadership’ is sounded through a false trumpet.”

– Norman G. Mosher, Capt, USN (Retired)
and former Professional Staff Member,
United States Senate Committee on Armed Services

“We owe General Gray and Dr. Otte great thanks for bringing us a very clear and convincing description of the U.S. Marine Corps’ extraordinary success in creating leaders and a culture of leadership throughout the organization. The military genuinely believes there is potential in most people. It is that profound belief that allows them to fully develop everyone’s potential.”

– Judith M. Bardwick
Author of “Danger in the Comfort Zone” and “In Praise of Good Business” 

 IslamicStateFlyer Page 1

 IslamicStateFlyer Page 2

The Potomac Institute Press is pleased to announce the latest book by Institute Chairman and CEO Michael Swetnam and ICTS Director Prof. Yonah Alexander, Al-Qa'ida: Ten Years After 9/11 and Beyond (Potomac Institute Press, 2012, ISBN: 978-0-9678594-6-0 Paperback, 454 pages).  Orders for Al-Qa'ida, Ten Years After and Beyond may be placed through Amazon.com.  Click here to access the Amazon listing.

Al-Qa'ida: Ten Years After 9/11 and Beyond follows the authors' 2001 book, Usama bin Laden's al-Qa'ida: Profile of a Terrorist Network, which came out just months before the 9/11 attacks.  The new volume offers comprehensive coverage of the group’s history, leadership, financing, propaganda, ideology, and  future outlook.

click here to purchase

 

Here's what prominent scholars are saying about Al-Qa'ida: Ten Years After 9/11 and Beyond:

“This is the indispensable book on al-Qa’ida, its spawn, and its affiliates.  Usama and many of his lieutenants have been killed, and the central “base” weakened. But radical Islam and sundry jihadi organizations live.  Yonah Alexander and Michael S. Swetnam have been writing about al-Qa’ida since 1988; they have not lost their touch.”  Don Wallace, Jr., Professor of Law at Georgetown University and Chairman of the International Law Institute.

“This comprehensive book on al-Qa’ida, its evolution, current status, ideology, modus operandi, and its affiliates provides an excellent source for both experts and those who want to learn about this organization and the challenges posed by international terrorism in general.” Shireen Hunter, Visiting Professor, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, and Distinguished Scholar, Center for Strategic and International Studies.

“Few experts on ‘jihadi’ terrorism can write with more authority on the past ten years of al-Qa’ida after 9/11 than Yonah Alexander and his colleague, Michael S. Swetnam.  Many things have happened in these ten years; 2011 was an important year just like 2001.  To understand what is likely to happen in the future, this book is a must read for both experts and all those interested in world peace.” Honorary Professor Ved Marwah, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi; Chairman, India’s Task Force on National Security and Criminal Justice System; Former Commissioner of Police Delhi; and Former Governor of Manipur and Jharkhand.

“Many books have been written on al-Qa’ida, but this comprehensive volume details not only the group’s origin and background, but also its evolution into the present. Yonah Alexander and Michael S. Swetnam have produced a much needed, up-to-date handbook on al-Qa’ida and its affiliated groups. An excellent source for all those who study or combat contemporary terrorism.” Michael Fredholm, Senior Researcher, Stockholm International Program for Central Asian Studies (SIPCAS), Stockholm University, Sweden.

“This book, produced from the pens of scholars that have been wrestling with the issues for decades, should come as a timely reminder that we might want to get back to business as usual but that the likes of al-Qa’ida won’t forget us.”  William J. Olson, Distinguished Professor, National Defense University.

Authors:

Yonah Alexander, PhD
Director, Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies
Director, International Center for Terrorism Studies, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, Arlington, VA, USA
Co-Director, Inter-University Center for Legal Studies at the International Law Institute, Washington, DC, USA

Michael S. Swetnam

CEO and Chairman, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, Arlington, VA, USA
Member, US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Technical Advisory Group
Former Special Consultant to the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, Washington, DC, USA

 

Table of Contents:

Introduction by Charles E. Allen
Chapter 1: Ideological and Theological Perspectives
and Goals
Chapter 2: Key Leadership
Chapter 3: Selected Modus Operandi
Chapter 4: Propaganda and Psychological Warfare
Chapter 5: Al-Qai’da’s Key Networks
Chapter 6: Selected Affiliated Groups
Chapter 7: Selected U.S. Individuals with Alleged
al-Qa’ida Connections
Chapter 8: Operation Neptune Spear and Beyond
Appendices
• Selected Electronic Political Communication from
al-Qa’ida (October 2001 – 2011)
• U.S. Indictment of Usama bin Laden (November 5, 1998)
• Remarks by the President on Osama bin Laden
(May 2, 2011)
• Ensuring al-Qa’ida’s Demise (Remarks by John Brennan
on June 29, 2011)
• National Strategy for Counterterrorism (June 2011)
• Empowering Local Partners to Prevent Violent
Extremism in the United States (August 2011)
• The Honorable James R. Clapper, Statement
• David H. Petraeus, Director of CIA, Statement

terrorBy Yonah Alexander and Tyler B. Richardson

Terror on the High Seas: From Piracy to Strategic Challenge is a provocative look at maritime security and the steps that must be taken if terrorist threats are to be nullified. From the Achille Lauro hijacking to the bombing of the USS Cole to attacks on shipping channels by Somali pirates, terrorists have employed a variety of tactics, both successful and unsuccessful. These have included the smuggling of arms and plots to bomb shipyards, as well as attacks on Merchant Marine ships, maritime offices, fuel storage facilities, and Navy personnel, ships, and facilities, both on shore and in port.

 This book constitutes the first research effort after the unprecedented attacks of September 11, 2001, to provide government, industry, and the academic and policy communities with a major resource on potential threats to the maritime environment. Assuming that past tactics, as well as a variety of other unconventional attacks, will be utilized by both domestic and international groups well into the 21st century, the book sagely outlines the response needed from government and industry to meet the coming challenges.

"Professor Yonah Alexander and Tyler Richardson have written and compiled an outstanding and comprehensive review of piracy and terrorism at sea, an essential tool by anyone desiring to understand and fight this timeless, and yet modern day, threat to public safety, international security and commerce.  They have constituted this book to provide governmental leaders, policy makers, academicians, law enforcement officials, and the maritime industry, with the body of knowledge, easily accessible, to achieve the deep understanding of where we are in addressing terror on the high seas, the indispensable prerequisite for charting the future through pirate-infested waters."
- Jamie Barnett, Rear Admiral USNR (Retired), Director of Naval Education & Training from 2004-2006

YONAH ALEXANDER is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies based at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies and the International Law Institute. He has published over 95 books in the field of international terrorism including The New Iranian Leadership: Ahmadinejad, Nuclear Ambition and the Middle East; Evolution of U.S. Counterterrorism Policy: A Documentary Collection (3 Vols.); and Turkey: Terrorism, Civil Rights, and the European Union.  TYLER RICHARDSON has served as the Director of Research for the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies and as Defense Fellow for the Long-Term Strategy Project, both in Washington, DC.  His work on maritime terrorism and port security issues has been published by The Washington Times, United Press International, The Jerusalem Post and The Lexington Institute.  Mr. Richardson holds a B.A. in English from Georgetown University and an MBA from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He currently works as a Senior Analyst in North Carolina. 
 
Publication date:  September 2009;  ISBN: 0-275-99750-2 (Two volumes, 660 pgs.)
$195.00  U.S. Dollars £134.95 Sterling

20% Pre Publication Discount  $156.00 U.S. Dollars; £107.95 Sterling

To order outside the US or for more information please contact:
Marston Book Services Ltd
160 Milton Park, Abingdon OX14 4SD, UK
PO Box 1437 • Oxford, UK OX4 9AZ
Tel: +44 (0)1235 465500; Fax: +44 (0)1235 465555
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Online: www.abc-clio.com
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The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is an independent, 501(c)(3), not-for-profit public policy research institute. The Institute identifies and aggressively shepherds discussion on key science and technology issues facing our society. From these discussions and forums, we develop meaningful science and technology policy options and ensure their implementation at the intersection of business and government.

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