Op-Ed Cautions That Iran's Enrichment For Nuclear Power Reactor Is Also Enough to Produce Nuclear Bombs

Extremely strict limitations on Iran's plans to enrich uranium are vital especially in the early stages of agreement negotiations, according to an opinion piece that ran in the Jerusalem Post Jan. 29.

The piece was co-written by Yonah Alexander, Director of Potomac Institute's International Center for Terrorism studies and the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies (Washington, DC); and Milton Hoenig, a consulting scientist.

Institute's Amb. Smith Cautions View of Russia's Intent and Actions Regarding Cyber Capabilities

Cyber operations are integrated into Russia’s military doctrine, and that country is using cyber tools and strategic espionage.  Russia’s capabilities and intent are readily apparent, but it never gets caught – which makes it as big of a cyber threat as countries like China, according to Potomac Institute Cyber Center Director Amb. David Smith (Ret.).

Smith’s article, “Russian Cyber Capabilities, Policy and Practice,” is featured in the Winter 2014 inFocus Quarterly, distributed by the Jewish Policy Center.  It can be read here.

Two attributes of Russia – it’s systemic corruption and it’s broad concept of information warfare – result in a booming cyber-criminal industry, Smith explained.  Russia’s concept of information security has three objectives, the first which is shared by almost every country:  protect strategically important information, protect against harmful foreign information, and instill patriotism in its people.

While it is wise to watch for Moscow’s cyber behavior with the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, it is important to note that Russia still refuses to join any international approach to cyber security challenges.

Whether or not Russia "gets caught" in its cyber activities, the U.S. must realize Russia’s capabilities and intent are a major cyber challenge.

Smith is also a Potomac Institute Senior Fellow and Director of the Georgian Security Analysis Center in Tbilisi.

PIPS ICTS Director Applauds Morocco's Role in Tension Zones in Middle East, Africa, and the Sahel-Saharan Region

The United States and Morocco continue to have a shared vision and common interest in key issues of human rights, civil liberties, and security, Prof. Yonah Alexander said in a recent interview with the Maghreb Arabe Press.  Ensuring a lasting alliance and partnership between the two countries is especially important, given uncertainties Morocco must deal with across the region.

Morocco's king recently visited President Obama, and that helped reinforce 2013 as a strong and productive year between the two countries.  During that visit, the U.S. administration reiterated that Morocco is a regional model for the fight against religious radicalism, Alexander noted in the story that was published in French and Arabic.

As a haven of stability, Alexander emphasized, Morocco demonstrates it gives an important place for security in civil society, so that economy, tourism, and agriculture can develop, because the government is responsive to the people.

Prof. Alexander is the Director of Potomac Institute's International Center for Terrorism Studies.  He is also a member of the Institute's Board of Regents and a Senior Fellow.   Dr. Alexander is founder and editor-in-chief of three academic international journals: Terrorism; Minorities and Group Rights; and Political Communication and Persuasion.  Since 2010, he has served as Editor-in-Chief of Partnership for Peace Review, a new journal under the auspices of NATO.  He recently presented a report on "Terrorism in North Africa and the Sahel: Global Reach and Implications." He also has published over 100 books including al-Qa’ida: Ten Years After 9/11 and Beyond; Terrorists in Our Midst: Combating Foreign Affinity Terrorism in America; Evolution of U.S. Counterterrorism Policy (three volumes); Turkey: Terrorism, Civil Rights, and the European Union; The New Iranian Leadership: Terrorism, Nuclear Ambition, and the Middle East Conflict; and Counterterrorism Strategies: Success and Failures of Six Nations.

 

 

Consistent, Individual Engagement With Other Countries Is Key To U.S. Success

Setting up a country for economic success with the right support structures is an important part of U.S. global engagement, and although these efforts take time, the United States is a beacon in the world and stands for what is right, said PIPS Vice President of Strategy and Planning Dave Reist in an interview with Russian Television. 

RT America, an English language Russian network, was covering a poll of 65 countries that discussed the U.S. role in peace and war, based on 2013 being a deadly year in Iraq.  Even though the majority of people polled criticized the U.S. for its global actions, the majority also said the United States is the country they would prefer to live in.

Asked if the United States was to blame for the continued violence in Iraq, Reist, a retired U.S. Marine Corp brigadier general who spent 1 1/2 years in Iraq's Anbar province, said that not having the right structures for better economic success caused an issue, and because power brokers inside of Iraq did not have the right oversight from Iraqi or U.S. forces, the situation was likely to deteriorate.  Add to that the fact the Middle East is going through a tumultuous time, and there are many causes for problems in Iraq.  The U.S. engages based on political will, Reist stated.

What the U.S. stands for will manifest itself across time, Reist reinforced, and that bears out by the high numbers of people who want to live in the United States, despite criticism of its foreign policy.  Additionally, the world sees and hears debate about issues  and disagreements in the United States because of free speech, which not every country enjoys.

Despite criticism of its activities, the United States doesn't waiver from policies and issues, and consistency in foreign policy takes time and effort, Reist emphasized.  

The story can be viewed here:  

PIPS ICTS Director Discusses Chechen History and Context, Impact on Russia and Putin, and Security Lessons Learned

(Jan. 2) PIPS ICTS Director Prof. Yonah Alexander discussed important Chechen history as well as political issues in a radio interview following the bombings in Russia earlier this week.

Alexander noted that the Chechen connection is not a recent phenomenon and actually goes back 200 years, with the Muslim ethnic minority resisting Russia for national reasons (independence) and religious reasons (did not want to be controlled by Christians.  Alexander explained that the location of the bombings - Volgograd, formerly Stalingrad - could symbolize freedom of Chechnya.

The other important issues to consider are the political, security, and propaganda dimensions of the attacks.  Politically, the bombings are a challenge to Putin on the eve of the Sochi Olympics, which are also labeled as Putin's Games.  The security challenge is that Chechens will not miss this opportunity, because terrorism is a great equalizer, and it's hard for Russia to halt these types of attacks.  From a propaganda perspective, the attacks are not just a disgrace on Russia but also bring attention and recognition to the Chechen cause.

Alexander reinforced the vital importance of historical lessons, especially Olympic attacks in the past.  There is a long list from which to learn - what worked and what didn't work, Alexander stated.

Professor Alexander previously served as Professor of International Affairs and Director of Terrorism Studies at the George Washington University as well as Professor of International Studies and Director of the Institute for Studies in International Terrorism at the State University of New York.  He has served as academic advisor to governments and international organizations (UN, NATO, OSCE, and the EU) and was consultant to various Olympic Games and to the International Academy of the Media in Moscow. 

He is founder and editor-in-chief of five academic international journals:  Terrorism; Minorities and Group Rights; Political Communication and Persuasions; NATO's Partnership for Peace Review; and Terrorism: An Electronic Journal & Knowledge Base. He has published over 100 books including "Al-Qa'ida:  Ten Years after 9/11 and Beyond," and others on terrorism and the Russian connection.

PICC Director Speaks to BBC Radio-4 on Current Frustrations in U.S. dealings with Ukraine

Amb. David Smith spoke with BBC Radio Dec. 11, discussing the situation in Ukraine as the U.S. considers sanctions following Ukraine crackdowns on protestors.  Smith supported the State Department's announcement that it would consider sanctions if the Ukrainian government continues the violence against the protestors in Maidan. 

Asked if sanctions might be a step too far, Smith answered that there is frustration in the United States because while there is a lot of talking, not much progress is being made.  Smith added that the real question becomes if the threat of sanctions is real and credible - will they happen, explaining that we know that we can't threaten with something we're not willing to follow through with.

Smith also touched on the Russian response, as the European Union is also considering measures.

The interview can be heard here, and the segment on Ukraine with Amb. Smith starts at approximately 33:00.

Senior Fellow Peggy Evans Highlights Merits And Challenges Of New Approach

One federal agency is trying to move past the slow approach of procuring emerging technology, and one of Potomac Institute's Senior Fellows applauds the effort to open the process to a wider group and making standards well-known, but advises addressing up front how reimbursement should be managed.

In a recent Federal News Radio article, found here, Senior Fellow Peggy Evans talks about the new Defense Intelligence Agency project, "Needipedia," which could be ready by January 2014.   Because the existing procurement process takes months, DIA put together a basic list of niche needs on a website, and the process also allows industry experts to present ideas; the intent is to shorten the process by not using RFP's every time a new requirement is identified.

Peggy Evans acknowledges the need to open up the process and make it more agile for the government and for industry, but cautioned that getting paid is extremely important to the technology industry.  Addressing those concerns early can make this a successful, responsive application that helps everyone involved.

 

Counterterrorism, Security Are Common Concerns

PIPS CEO Mike Swetnam spoke on the importance of U.S. and Morocco relations on the eve of the visit of Morocco's King to the United States.

In an interview with Morocco TV, Swetnam reinforced the importance of Morocco's work in helping stop Al Qaeda efforts in Northern Africa, which has a global impact.  The United States and Morocco consult closely on regional security, democratic and economic reforms, and many other vital issues to stability.  Morocco works closely with U.S. law enforcement to safeguard both countries' national security interests.

Morocco's strong leadership in the region, as well as their commitment to development and democracy, is key to the strong bi-lateral relations.

Tawfik Hamid, Potomac Institute Senior Fellow and chair of the study of Islamic Radicalism at the Institute, recently spoke to Fox News to discuss the Muslim Brotherhood's radical ties.

Treating the organization as a moderate group would be a mistake, Hamid said in an interview.  Although the first three stages of how the Brotherhood works is peaceful, the fourth is using violence to enforce Sharia, or the religious law of Islam, according to Hamid.  But if their operations spread, the fourth stage will become reality.   

Although the Muslim Brotherhood doesn't directly engage in terrorist acts, Hamid said he believes they secretly support jihad movements, and he cited examples of that work. 

Hamid spoke further on the current situation in Egypt, including Morsi's removal from power.  

The story can be read here.

 

 

Important decisions regarding technology, operational requirements and the industrial base impact of the U.S. Navy’s Zumwalt-Class lead destroyer are worth reviewing and learning from, according to Potomac Institute’s Board of Regent Member and Senior Fellow, John Young.

Young’s commentary appeared in Defense News, where he says many concerns and sensational projections about the technical risk and cost of the new destroyer have been wrong.

According to Young, the destroyer program has had its share of critics, but the Zumwalt-class destroyer shows success in several areas:

Technology: The DDG 1000 relies on many new technologies but didn’t have cost growth like other DoD programs and is delivering those new technologies. Just as importantly, the program confirms “the importance of technology maturation and prototyping.”  The program was well-structured and relied on models for key systems.

Operational Requirement:  Critics said there wasn’t a need for a gunship in today’s warfare.  But the DDG 1000 gives defensive support to the littoral combat ship, which has no defensive capability.  Importantly, Young adds, the hull for this destroyer would evolve into a future cruiser.

Industrial Base:  Critics derailed the Navy's "coherent and carefully considered strategy," which was geared toward giving the Navy the ability to perform missions in the littorals, to evolve to a fleet of cruisers with more capability and survivability, and to sustain a stable industrial base.  When reviewing the changes and restarts to the shipbuilding and planning efforts, the projections about the new destroyers technical risk and cost have been shown to be inaccurate.

Young finishes the piece stating that decisions the Navy made in the context of the DDG 1000 program are worth reviewing, because what is being delivered is a very capable destroyer.

Before his current association with the Potomac Institute, Young previously served as the U.S. Navy's assistant secretary for research, development and acquisition.   He is the principal in JY Strategies LLC.

 

The shift in Iran's public stance on working within a framework to manage differences with the United Nations and the West seems like a step in the right direction, but caution is warranted based on the history of Iran's inconsistent words and actions, according to Amb. David Smith, Senior Fellow at Potomac Institute and its Cyber Center Director.

Smith co-wrote the opinion piece with Bijan R. Kian, former member of the board of directors of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, a former member of the White House Business Council and a former senior fellow for Global Public Policy at the United States Naval Postgraduate School. Woolsey is a former director of the Central Intelligence Agency and chairs the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies.

The authors point toward a history of tough sanctions that may have resulted in short term reasonable behavior from Iran's past presidents but in reality continued down the path of their stated goal of a nuclear weapons program.

Listing example after example of historical examples of lack of good faith and continuing to walk away from necessary compliance, the authors recommend several steps that Iran must take to show they are serious and will work with the U.N. and others.

No matter what a person -- or a country's leader -- says, the actions will speak louder on intent, as portrayed in a Persian fable the authors use to reinforce their concerns.

Read more: http://thehill.com/opinion/op-ed/326221-rouhanis-rooster-tail#ixzz2gkfOJs50 
 

Potomac Institute Senior Fellow Amb. David Smith recently co-authored an article titled "Azerbaijan moves toward democracy" with R. James Woolsey, former director of Central Intelligence. 

The piece, which ran in August, highlights upcoming elections in Azerbiajan and important steps and ingredients to building a successful, strong democratic society.  While recognizing some shortcomings in Azerbaijan, the authors noted important elements there that can help build toward success:  "indigenous democratic traditions; a high educational level; devotion to secularism; moderation and mutual respect; remarkable economic development; and a pivotal position in East-West trade."

After providing several examples of continuing investments Azerbaijan has made in the move toward democracy, the authors highlight that country's role as an important security partner and the prominence that area has --the South Caucasus Eas-West Corridor -- in U.S. security interests.

The article can be found on The Hill's website,

Potomac Institute's Senior Fellow David Kay featured in AFP story on Syria and chemical weapons:

Securing Syria's chemical arms would carry huge risks

AFP

"It seems obvious but it's not easy," Kay, now a senior fellow at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, told AFP. Syria is believed to have hundreds of tons of chemical agents such as sarin and VX as well as mustard gas.

Potomac Institute hosted Marine Lt. Gen. William Faulkner to discuss how the Marine Corps is resetting its equipment, as the service faces the challenge of downsizing and becoming a lighter and more agile force.

Afghanistan retrograde moving fast

Marine Corps Times

Speaking at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies in April, Lt. Gen. William Faulkner said the reset is a “good news story.” The Corps has reduced the total number of equipment items remaining in Afghanistan by 60 percent in the past 15 months

Senior Vice President of National Security Policy Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), is a retired Navy admiral, a cyber security analyst, and a former Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.  In an interview with Federal News Radio, he offered his observations on the top three challenges facing the Department of Defense in 2013.  At the top of the list: critical gaps in oversight of the supply chain for the Pentagon's electronic systems.  Click below to listen to the interview. Click here to read more.

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Potomac Institute for Policy Studies Senior Fellow Amb. David Smith (Ret.) is the Director of the Potomac Institute Cyber Center. He is a cyber security and cyber policy analyst, and a former US arms negotiator.  In an op-ed for Defense News entitled "Hackers Join the Fight," he writes that the recent Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Gaza not only made it clear that cyber attacks will  be a part of warfare henceforth, but also marked the arrival of "warfare’s newest actor — the freelance cyber warrior."  Click here to read the article in full.

On December 4, The Potomac Institute Press launched the new book #CyberDoc: No Borders - No Boundaries, at a special conference entitled A National Cyber Doctrine:  The Time Is Now, at the National Press Club.  The book is co-edited by Potomac Institute CEO and Chairman Michael Swetnam and by Timothy Sample, Vice President and Sector Manager for Battelle Memorial Institute’s Special  Programs Organization, and it addresses the urgent need for a national cyber doctrine to guide the US in this challenging new security environment. The book and event transcript were both cited on the Government Technology news website, which states that the event provided "a wealth of information regarding why a doctrine for dealing with cybersecurity is important." Click here to read the Government Technology piece. The book and event were also cited in National Defense, which called for action on formulating a cyber doctrine.  Click here to read the National Defense piece.  #CyberDoc is available for purchase on Amazon.com;  click here for the Amazon listing.

Senior Vice President of National Security Policy Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), recently served as Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.  In comments to Hawaii's Civil Beat news website, he reacted to officials' decision to move Hawaii's tsunami siren system to cellular and satellite networks.  RDML Barnett says that decision raises questions about whether the siren system will be effective in an emergency.  Click here to read the article in full.

Potomac Institute for Policy Studies Senior Fellow Amb. David Smith (Ret.) is the Director of the Potomac Institute Cyber Center. He is a cyber security and cyber policy analyst, and a former US arms negotiator.  In comments cited in Foreign Policy's "Killer Apps" column, he noted that the online theft of US intellectual property is supporting technological advances in Russia, China and elsewhere. The comments were part of a report noting that the 2013 defense authorization bill includes a new requirement that all defense contractors promptly report any cyber intrusions into their systems.  Click here to read the article in full.

Senior Vice President of National Security Policy Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), recently served as Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.  In comments to The New York Times, he reacted to the ongoing struggle to implement a nationwide communications system for first responders.  Click here to read the article in full.

Senior Fellow Dr. David Kay is a weapons nonproliferation expert and former head of the Iraq Survey Group.  In comments to WTOP radio on the crisis in Syria, he explained how sarin gas could be deployed as a weapon.  Recent reports indicate that the Syrian regime might be planning a gas attack on opposition forces and civilians, but WTOP reports that some within Syria are skeptical. Click here to read and listen to WTOP coverage.

Senior Vice President of National Security Policy Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), is a retired Navy admiral and cyber security analyst, and former Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.  In comments to Federal Computer Week, he joined other experts in a year-end assessment of the top developments in cyber security for 2012.  Click here to read the article in full.

The Potomac Institute Press launched the new book #CyberDoc: No Borders - No Boundaries, at a special conference entitled A National Cyber Doctrine:  The Time Is Now, on December 4 at the National Press Club.  The book is co-edited by Potomac Institute CEO and Chairman Michael Swetnam and by Timothy Sample, Vice President and Sector Manager for Battelle Memorial Institute’s Special  Programs Organization, and it addresses the urgent need for a national cyber doctrine to guide the US in this challenging new security environment.  Click here to read coverage of the event on the CIO news website.  #CyberDoc is available for purchase on Amazon.com;  click here for the Amazon listing.

Potomac Institute for Policy Studies CEO and Chairman Mike Swetnam is co-editor of the new Potomac Institute Press book, #CyberDoc: No Borders—No Boundaries, which explores the national cyber security risk facing the US.  (Click here for preordering information on Amazon.)  In a live interview on Federal News Radio, he talked about the new book and the difference between cyber doctrine and the cyber policy that flows from it. Click the player below to listen to the interview in full.

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Senior Vice President of National Security Policy Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), is a retired Navy admiral and cyber security analyst, and former Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.  In an interview on Bloomberg TV's Bloomberg West show, he talked about the role of cyber attacks in the recent Gaza conflict.  RDML Barnett says such attacks are likely to become a permanent fixture of warfare in a world where "1s and 0s" can now be used as weapons.   Click below to watch the interview in full.

The Potomac Institute Cyber Center blog, PotomacCyber, features a new post this week by PICC Fellow Khatuna Mshvidobadze on Russia's announcement that it intends to crack down on cyber crime.  She writes that while that might sound like a positive step, what Moscow really means is that it intends to crack down on online dissent.  Click here to read the post in full.

Senior Vice President of National Security Policy Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), is a retired Navy admiral and cyber security analyst, and former Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.  In  comments to Homeland Security Today, he offered observations on the lack of a comprehensive cyber doctrine to guide US policy in the area of cybersecurity.  The need for such a doctrine will be the topic of a special Potomac Institute panel discussion at the National Press Club on December 4 (click here for information on the event)Click here to read the article in Homeland Security Today.

Vice President of Strategy and Planning BGen David Reist, USMC (Ret.), is a national security analyst and military expert. In an interview with Federal News Radio, he commented on how a new Presidential directive on cyber security could change the military's role in fighting - and deterring - cyber attacks.  Click below to listen to the interview in full.

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Senior Vice President of National Security Policy Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), recently (2009-2012) served in an IPA assignment as Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHSB). In comments to Defense News, he reacted to the failure of cyber security legislation to make it through the current lame-duck session of Congress.  RDML Barnett, who will be a panelist at the Institute's upcoming major Cyber Policy event on December 4, says, “We need a clearly articulated cyber doctrine.” Click here to read the article in full.

Potomac Institute for Policy Studies experts Prof. Yonah Alexander, Jamie Barnett, RDML USN (Ret.), and LCDR Sean Brandes, USN, write in a new op-ed for US News & World Report that while the world is focused on Iran's nuclear ambitions, the regime in Tehran has been steadily building its naval capabilities.  The authors maintain that despite high-tech advances in warfare, what was true centuries ago remains true today: control of the seas is paramount for any nation with aspirations to regional domination - or more.  Click here to read the op-ed in full.

The Institute's International Center for Terrorism Studies will host a special seminar on maritime challenges, on November 29. Click here for details.

Senior Vice President of National Security Policy Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), recently (2009-2012) served in an IPA assignment as Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHSB).  In comments to Bloomberg News, he reacted to reports of widespread cell phone outages following Superstorm Sandy.  RDML Barnett's take:  the FCC has a role to play in setting minimum backup power requirements for carriers.  Click here to read the article in full.

Senior Vice President of National Security Policy Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), recently served in an IPA assignment as Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHSB). He contributed comments to The Wall Street Journal for a story about cell phone outages in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, noting that carriers may ultimately pass on the costs of making networks more reliable. Click here to read the article in full.

Senior Vice President of Academic Programs and Research Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), recently served in an IPA assignment as Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHSB).

The Potomac Institute Cyber Center blog, PotomacCyber, features a new post this week by PICC Fellow Khatuna Mshvidobadze on an alleged case of illegal exports of high-tech electronics to Russia.  She notes that according to an FBI press release, "These commodities have applications and are frequently used in a wide range of military systems, including radar and surveillance systems, missile guidance systems, and detonation triggers." Click here to read the post in full.

Senior Vice President of Academic Programs and Research Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), recently served in an IPA assignment as Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHSB).  In an interview with CBS radio Los Angeles affiliate KNX 1070, he addressed concerns about the operation of cell phone service during a disaster such as a major earthquake. The interview follows a massive cell phone outage after the Virginia earthquake of 2011, and came during the Great California Shakeout earthquake preparation drill.  Click below to listen.

{saudioplayer}Jamie Barnett KNX 10-18-12.mp3{/saudioplayer}

The Potomac Institute Press release of  Al-Qa’ida: Ten Years After 9/11 and Beyond,  is more timely than ever in light of recent events. The arrest of a man who allegedly claimed al-Qa'ida ties and planned to blow up the Federal Reserve building in New York, along with reports that the deadly attack on the US consulate in Benghazi could be linked to an al-Qa'ida affiliate, are stark reminders that the terrorist group continues to exert influence despite severe blows to its command and control structure.   To learn more about why this is a threat that just won't go away, now is the time to read  Al-Qa’ida: Ten Years After 9/11 and Beyond (Potomac Institute Press, 2012) by ICTS Director Prof. Yonah Alexander and Institute Chairman and CEO Michael S. Swetnam.   Click here to find the book on Amazon.com: click here for the Kindle edition.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce that Brian J. Morra has been named a Senior Fellow and Member of the Board of Regents.  Mr. Morra serves as Sector Vice President, Strategic Planning, for the Electronic Systems Sector of Northrop Grumman Corporation.

Regarding Mr. Morra's appointment, Potomac Institute Chairman and CEO Michael Swetnam noted, "Brian Morra has decades of experience in the Defense Industrial Base.  He has extensive experience in National Security, Intelligence, and defense manufacturing.  He brings this experience combined with great foresight to the Institute at a time when we are increasing our presence in the National Security and Intelligence fields.  Brian's advice and counsel have guided me personally for decades, and it is my great pleasure to welcome him to the Potomac Institute family."

Potomac Institute for Policy Studies Senior Fellow Amb. David Smith (Ret.) is the Director of the Potomac Institute Cyber Center. He is a cyber security and cyber policy analyst, and a former US arms negotiator.  In an interview with Federal News Radio, he reacted to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta's comments warning that a cyber "Pearl Harbor" could be coming if the US doesn't pay more attention to cyber defense. Click here to read and listen to the story on the Federal News Radio website.

Prof. Yonah Alexander, PhD, is Director of the International Center for Terrorism Studies at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies.  In an op-ed for The Jerusalem Post, he writes that as the international community considers the establishment of "red lines" for aggressive behavior by nations, it should establish just such a line prohibiting the exploitation of religion to do harm. "In the face of the unprecedented contemporary challenge of the 'religionization' of politics and its grave humanitarian and strategic implications," Prof. Alexander writes, "it behooves the international community to draw a red line of unacceptable behavior in the name of religion for any cause." Click here to read the article in full.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce that Courtney Merriman has been promoted to the position of Research Associate.  Ms. Merriman joined the Institute as a Research Assistant in 2009.

Regarding Ms. Merriman's promotion, Dwight Lyons, Director of the Concepts & Analyses Division, commented, "Courtney has taken on increasingly challenging tasks at the Potomac Institute, and has just completed a major milestone by successfully leading the most complex analytic task we have undertaken in the Concepts & Analyses Division. Congratulations to her on a well-deserved and thoroughly-earned promotion."

Ms. Merriman said, "I very much appreciate this promotion and the new responsibilities associated with the position. I look forward to new and more challenging opportunities while continuing my work in the Concepts & Analyses Division.”

Senior Vice President of Academic Programs and Research Jamie Barnett, Jr., RDML USNR (Ret.), recently served in an IPA assignment as Chief of the Federal Communications Commission's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHSB), where he was active in promoting cyber security issues.  RDML Barnett was a featured speaker at an October 1-3 Military Cyber Security Symposium in Arlington, VA, that brought together leaders from the intelligence community, the Pentagon, and industry.   His talk was on “Cyber Policy Development & Decision Making at the Highest Levels of Government.”  Click on the attachment below to view slides from the presentation.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is honored to serve as a nonpartisan, not-for-profit science and technology policy research organization. The Institute is committed to upholding high standards of integrity as it pursues its core objectives to advance the cause of unbiased science and technology policy research and to provide a forum for the free exchange of ideas in the service of informing public policy. As a formal expression of its commitment to these principles, the Institute has published its Standards of Conduct and Ethics Policy updated as of October 1, 2012. Click on the attachment below to read the policy in full.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies' September 26 panel discussion on cybersecurity, "Addressing the Supply Chain Threat," attracted significant media attention to this pressing issue.  The event, co-hosted with National Security Partners, brought together a group of experts including Dennis Bartko, Director's Special Assistant for Cyber, National Security Agency; Melissa Hathaway, former Acting Senior Director for Cyberspace, US National Security Council; and Brett Lambert, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manufacturing and the Industrial Base.  Click here to access Federal News Radio coverage of the event;  click here to access American Forces Press Service coverage;  click here to read Foreign Policy coverage; click here to read AOLDefense coverage; click here to read NextGov.com coverage; click here to read Federal Computer Week coverage.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce that Prof. James Giordano, PhD, Senior Fellow, Member of the Board of Regents, and Director of the Center for Neurotechnology Studies, has won the 2012 Klaus Reichert Award for Medical Philosophy. Prof. Giordano shares the award with Dr. Roland Benedikter of Stanford University. Dr. Benedikter is also an Academic Fellow of the Potomac Institute, and  Giordano is also Chief of the Neuroethics Studies Program at the Center for Clinical Bioethics, and Professor of Integrative Physiology at the Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC. As well, he is William H. and Ruth Crane Schaefer Visiting Professor at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC, and 2011-2012 Fulbright Professor of Neuroscience and Neuroethics at the Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich Germany.

As a result of the award, Prof. Giordano has been honored with an invitation from the President of the European Academy of Arts and Sciences to present a Klaus Reichert lecture at the Academy in Vienna, Austria. He has also been invited to present special Reichert lectures at the University of Halle in Germany, and to Munich's Consortium for Science, Technology and the Humanities at the Ludwig Maximilians University.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce that Amy O'Leary has been promoted to the position of Research Associate.  Ms. O'Leary has been employed as a Research Assistant in the Institute's Concepts & Analyses Division since 2010. In 2012, she was honored with the Institute's Junior Research Award.

Regarding Ms. O'Leary's new role, Dwight Lyons, Director of the Concepts & Analyses Division, commented, “ Amy O’Leary has progressed rapidly in learning and applying operations analysis skills, reaching a major milestone by independently leading a significant analytic task. I am extremely pleased with her accomplishments and her promotion to Research Associate. Bravo Zulu, Amy!”

Ms. O'Leary added, "I am very excited for this new opportunity that will increase my professional responsibilities and continue my development as an analyst.”   

Academic Fellow Ben Sheppard, PhD, is a counterterrorism expert and analyst, and the author of the book The Psychology of Strategic Terrorism. In an interview on Washington, DC's FOX-5 News, he discussed the aftermath of the protests in Egypt and Libya that led to the death of the US ambassador to Libya.  The protests were reportedly sparked by an anti-Muslim video circulated on YouTube.  Click below to watch the interview in full.

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The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce that Gerold Yonas, PhD, has been named a Senior Fellow and a member of the Board of Regents.  Dr. Yonas serves as a Research Science Affiliate at the Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM.

Regarding Dr. Yonas' selection as a Senior Fellow and member of the Board of Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies Chairman and CEO Michael Swetnam commented, "Dr. Yonas is a legend in science and technology.  He has led and directed some of this country's most important national security projects.  His great vision and vast expertise will greatly add to our capabilities."

Dr. Yonas added, "I have worked with Mike Swetnam and the Potomac Institute for many years, and I am honored to join the team."

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce that Lieutenant Commander Sean Brandes, USN, has joined the Institute as Cyber Federal Executive Fellow for 2012-2013.  LCDR Brandes is the third Fellow to participate in the program at the Institute, which began in 2010. According to the Navy’s outline for the program, the Fellowship is designed to “give mid-level officers an opportunity to increase their understanding of cyber policy development and decision making at the highest levels of government.”

LCDR Brandes, a native of Staten Island, New York, graduated with honors from Arizona State University with a bachelor's degree in Psychology and was commissioned at Officer Candidate School in 1998.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce that Rashid A. Chotani, MD, MPH, DTM, has been named a Senior Fellow.  Dr. Chotani serves as the Director of Chemical-Biological Defense Programs at TASC.

Regarding Dr. Chotani's appointment as a Senior Fellow, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies Chairman and CEO Michael Swetnam said, "Dr.Chotani's expertise is unmatched and greatly complements the work at the Potomac Institute. His input and advice will be a critical component of our future."

“I was humbled when offered a Senior Fellow position at the Institute,” Dr. Chotani commented.  “I have been an avid student of the critical science and technology policy issues as they pertain to National Security and have admired the Institute’s efforts in that arena.  It will be an honor and a privilege to contribute to the mission of the Institute by sharing my national and international experiences in medical diplomacy, chemical-biological and natural infectious disease threats facing our nation.”

The Honorable Charles Herzfeld, PhD, is a Senior Fellow and Member of the Board of Regents of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies.  He has often been called the "godfather" of the internet, for his role in the development of the Defense Department's original ARPAnet computer network.  In an interview with Wired's Danger Room, he talked about the need for data management at a South Pacific missile test site in the early 1960s, and how it played a role in the genesis of the Web. Click here to read the story in full.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce that Francis Landolf has been named a Senior Fellow and a member of the Board of Regents.  Mr. Landolf is a Principal with Core Consulting, LLC.

Potomac Institute for Policy Studies Chairman and CEO Michael Swetnam welcomed Mr. Landolf's selection as a Senior Fellow and member of the Board of Regents, commenting, "Fran Landolf is one of this country's most accomplished and experienced Intelligence Officials.  His advice and counsel have been sought by the US Congress and several Administrations.  The Potomac Institute is honored to have his advice and guidance."

Mr. Landolf added, "I have been a fan and friend of the Potomac Institute for a long time. I have seen how the work done by their scholars has influenced national-level leaders and policy makers in a broad range of important civilian, defense and national security-related issues.  It is indeed a privilege to join the Institute as a Senior Fellow and a member of the Board of Regents, and I very much look forward to an opportunity to contribute to its important mission."

Address

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies
Ballston Metro Center Office Towers
901 North Stuart Street, Suite 1200
Arlington, VA 22203
Tel 703.525.0770

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Our Mission

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is an independent, 501(c)(3), not-for-profit public policy research institute. The Institute identifies and aggressively shepherds discussion on key science and technology issues facing our society. From these discussions and forums, we develop meaningful science and technology policy options and ensure their implementation at the intersection of business and government.

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