Steps Issue 4

Download PDF VersionThe Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce publication of the July 2016, STEPS Issue 4, Science, Technology, and Engineering Policy Studies. STEPS is the technical publication of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies that presents articles to introduce bold and innovative thoughts in technology development, and discusses policy implications and directions.

The July 2016 Issue of STEPS addresses the idea of taking science and technology from the academic and commercial environments, and applying them to government needs. Robert Hummel and Kathryn Schiller Wurster, discuss strategies that DIUx might take to foster innovation in DoD. Brian Barnett and Jennifer Buss present findings and recommendations concerning the DoD commercial technology acquisition. James Giordano and Rachel Wurzman discuss the concept of NEURINT. Authors continue to express opinions on timely topics of science and technology policy in Viewpoints.

This issue, and future issues of STEPS include, but are not limited to: discussions of policies that either promote or impede S&T research; articles that address implications and/or consequences of S&T advances on national or international policies and governance; articles that introduce or review a topics in science, technology, or engineering, including considerations of potential societal impacts and influences; and non-partisan opinion pieces concerning policies relevant to S&T, to include S&T research trends; S&T policy event highlights; editorials; book reviews; and similar contributions.

We encourage you to enjoy this issue of STEPS—Science, Technology, and Engineering Policy Studies. download the pdf

Highlights from this Edition

Articles

Department of Defense's Innovation Experiment
by Robert Hummel, PhD and Kathryn Schiller Wurster

Department of Defense Commercial Technology Acquisition : A Survey
by Brian Barnett and Jennifer Buss, PhD

Integrative Computational and Neurocognitive Science and Technology for Intelligence Operations: Horizons of Potential Viability, Value and Opportunity
by James Giordano, PhD and Rachel Wurzman, PhD

Views in Brief

Reimagining the American Dream
by Charles Mueller, PhD

Organizing Chaos: A Unified Vision for S&T
by Charles Mueller, PhD, Rebecca McCauley Rench, PhD and Paul Syers, PhD

Regulatory Failure in Flint Michigan
by Carly Brody

STEPS is the technical publication of the Potomac Institute, where scholarly articles of broad interest are published for the policy studies communities. If you are interested in publishing in STEPS or if you wish to discuss a topic before completing an article please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is an independent, 501(c)(3), not-for-profit public policy research institute. The Institute identifies and aggressively shepherds discussion on key science and technology issues facing our society. From these discussions and forums, we develop meaningful science and technology policy options and ensure their implementation at the intersection of business and government.

Steps Issue 3

Click to Download PDFAnnouncing the Release of the February 2016 Issue 3 of STEPS

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce publication of the February 2016, STEPS Issue 3, Science, Technology, and Engineering Policy Studies. STEPS is the technical publication of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies that presents articles to introduce bold and innovative thoughts in technology development, and discusses policy implications and directions.

The February 2016 Issue of STEPS addresses historical and future policy issues. Potomac Institute Board of Regents member Gerry Yonas discusses the Reykjavik summit and the failure of the principals to achieve an agreement on nuclear disarmament, from his vantage point as a former chief scientist of the “Star Wars” project. Jim Richardson’s article makes the case for an Office of Science Policy to clean up the mess of R&D policy-making. In an article by the Microelectronics team at the Potomac Institute, Michael Fritze heralds the demise of Moore’s Law and considers the future. The issue includes viewpoint articles and news items.

This issue, and future issues of STEPS, include discussions of policies that either promote or impede S&T research; articles that address implications and/or consequences of S&T advances on national or international policies and governance; articles that introduce or review topics in science, technology, or engineering, including considerations of potential societal impacts and influences; and non-partisan opinion pieces concerning policies relevant to S&T. These include S&T research trends, S&T policy event highlights, editorials, book reviews, and similar contributions.

We encourage you to read this issue of STEPS—Science, Technology, and Engineering Policy Studies, and encourage you to contribute articles for consideration. Download the pdf here. Alternatively, visit our website — http://www.potomacinstitute.org/steps.

Highlights from this Edition

Articles

It's Laboratory or Goodbye by Gerold Yonas, PhD and Jill Gibson
Rationalizing the National S&T Policy Mess by James Richardson, PhD
The Death of Moore's Law by Mike Fritze, PhD; Patrick Cheetham; Jennifer Lato; and Paul Syers, PhD


Views in Brief

Global Extinction or a Space-Industrial Complex by Kevin Hertzler and Rebecca McCauley Rench, PhD
Book Review - Wayward Pines: Where Paradise is Home by Rebecca McCauley Rench, PhD

 

Click to Download Full PDF


STEPS is the technical publication of the Potomac Institute, where scholarly articles of broad interest are published for the policy studies communities. For information about submitting an article or discussing a potential submission, prospective authors are referred to http://www.potomacinstitute.org/steps/about-us/instructions-for-authors.

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is an independent, 501(c)(3), not-for-profit public policy research institute. The Institute identifies and aggressively shepherds discussion on key science and technology issues facing our society. From these discussions and forums, we develop meaningful science and technology policy options and ensure their implementation at the intersection of business and government.

STEPS Issue 2

 

CoverfromSTEPS2Final19OctPrint

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is pleased to announce the 2nd Issue of STEPS: Science, Technology, and Engineering Policy Studies. STEPS is the technical publication of the Potomac Institute that presents articles that introduce bold and innovative thoughts in technology development, and discusses policy implications in response to technology developments.

The October Issue of STEPS addresses a number of diverse policy issues. Alden Munson, the former acquisition chief of the intelligence community, asks the timely question “Why Can’t We Get Acquisitions Right?” as the government readdresses acquisition reform. Articles also discuss the stresses on S&T research caused by budget cuts, the futility of ITAR, and the value of our personal data being divulged online. Viewpoint articles discuss the need to improve international space treaties to the seemingly outlandish suggestion to build coastal cities on floating pontoons. This issue, and future issues of STEPS include, but are not limited to: discussions of policies that either promote or impede S&T research; articles that address implications and/or consequences of S&T advances on national or international policies and governance; articles that introduce or review a topics in science, technology, or engineering, including considerations of potential societal impacts and influences; and non-partisan opinion pieces concerning policies relevant to S&T, to include S&T research trends; S&T policy event highlights; editorials; book reviews; and similar contributions.

We encourage you to read this issue of STEPS—Science, Technology, and Engineering Policy Studies.   download the pdf.

In This Issue

The Navigator Awards, by Richard Pera

Articles

Why Can't We Get Acquisitions Right? How the Conspiracy of Hope Undermines Acquisition Performance, by Alden Munson 
Stress Fractures, by Ken Hamilton 
The Decline and Fall of the ITAR Empire, by Robert Hummel, PhD, Richard Pera, and Charles Mueller, PhD 
The Cost of Access, by Jennifer McArdle, Brian Barnett, and Kathy Goodson, PhD

Views in Brief

Space to Breathe: The Argument for a New Outer Space Treaty, by Joshua Hampson
Water on the Rise: Policies for Coastal Plains, by Christopher A. Wilson

STEPS is the technical publication of the Potomac Institute, where scholarly articles of broad interest are published for the policy studies communities. If you are interested in publishing in STEPS or if you wish to discuss a topic before completing an article please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies is an independent, 501(c)(3), not-for-profit public policy research institute. The Institute identifies and aggressively shepherds discussion on key science and technology issues facing our society. From these discussions and forums, we develop meaningful science and technology policy options and ensure their implementation at the intersection of business and government.

 

©, 2016, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, All rights reserved.

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STEPS (Online) ISSN: 2333-3200

STEPS (Print) ISSN: 2333-3219

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